Massachusetts

Kitchens, declining democracies and black governors in Today’s History Highlights – 7.24.2013

GE Ad from the 1930s: Don't let your kitchen be a Drudgehole.

Don’t let your kitchen become a drudgehole! No, not that drudgehole. We’re simply recalling the marketing wizardry behind GE’s all electric kitchen that toured the country in the 1930s. From fridge to stove to in-sink garbage disposal, GE was riding the wave of electrification right into the hearts’ of America’s housewives. Muddy river musings remembers the 1933 arrival of the GE kitchen on wheelsThe mobile kitchens were wildly popular promotional vehicles (GE reportedly built 100 of them) and they rolled across the country drawing eager customers to their local appliance stores to get a look at what their kitchen could look like.

What’s 100 years old, and hasn’t changed a bit? If you answered, Vermont’s workers compensation law, I’d say … you must have clicked this link before you answered, because the SCOV blog has published  “Roughly Right” vs. “Totally Wrong” about Injured Workers and taken a useful look at how and why injured workers in Vermont are treated the way they are today, and why it’s not likely to change any time soon.

Is the great democratic experiment over? While Americans proceed with their lives, comfortable in the notion that democracy and self-determination are the best forms of government, is the world beginning to slip into old habits of military rule and despotism? Why is democracy losing ground? And does anyone really care, as long as they have the latest video games to occupy their time? Yale Press discusses the issue in its blog post about its new book Democracy in Retreat.

Today’s Flashback Photo. We focused on Nero Brewster of Portsmouth, N.H., in our story about Black Kings and Governors of early New England. Now our friends at the African Burial Ground National Monument tell us the home of two black governors in Derby, Conn., was excavated by Central Connecticut State College Prof. Warren Perry, Gerald Sawyer and Janet Woodruff.  An online exhibit from the Hartford Black History Project includes a table of all the known black kings and governors – definitely worth checking out. This is also the source of today’s Flashback Photo of a “Parade of ‘Black Governors’ of Hartford,” a Connecticut Magazine reproduction of a 1905 lithograph by H.P. Arms.

Today's Flashback Photo...

Parade of ‘Black Governors’ of Hartford, H.P. Arms

Parade of ‘Black Governors’ of Hartford, H.P. Arms

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

To Top