History Happens – Try To Keep Up

Historical organizations are all around us in New England
Here are updates from some of our Favorites!

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The 25th Newport Flower Show
"Voices In The Garden"
Coming this June 2020

www.newportmansions.org/events/newport-flower-show
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The 25th Newport Flower Show 
Voices In The Garden
Coming this June 2020  https://www.newportmansions.org/events/newport-flower-show

The Preservation Society is participating in a statewide giving day known as 401Gives. This campaign was created to give Rhode Island’s nonprofit community a collective voice and help deepen the state’s culture of philanthropy.

In a matter of hours after 401Gives launched, supporters like YOU have helped us raise nearly $1,000. Your generosity makes a huge difference especially at this critical time. Join the 401Gives movement and make your gift ‪before 6 a.m. on April 2.‬

Visit www.401gives.org/organizations/the-preservation-society-of-newport-county to make your gift now!
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The Preservation Society is participating in a statewide giving day known as 401Gives. This campaign was created to give Rhode Island’s nonprofit community a collective voice and help deepen the state’s culture of philanthropy.  In a matter of hours after 401Gives launched, supporters like YOU have helped us raise nearly $1,000. Your generosity makes a huge difference especially at this critical time. Join the 401Gives movement and make your gift ‪before 6 a.m. on April 2.‬  Visit  https://www.401gives.org/organizations/the-preservation-society-of-newport-county to make your gift now!

We're sending all our MHS social media friends this #MuseumBouquet as a bit of brightness. Ann Longfellow Stephenson (1814-1861) of Gorham created a scrapbook entitled "Herbarium" and included specimens of pressed flowers and leaves. This 1851 posy includes a rose and pansy, among other flowers. Collections MHS / MMN # 23493 ... See MoreSee Less

Were sending all our MHS social media friends this #MuseumBouquet as a bit of brightness. Ann Longfellow Stephenson (1814-1861) of Gorham created a scrapbook entitled Herbarium and included specimens of pressed flowers and leaves. This 1851 posy includes a rose and pansy, among other flowers. Collections MHS / MMN # 23493

Comment on Facebook

I am misty, crying but thank you for this, it is lovely. thank you for thinking of us.

Today, the Preservation Society is participating in a statewide giving day known as 401Gives. This campaign was created to give Rhode Island’s nonprofit community a collective voice and help deepen the state’s culture of philanthropy.

For cultural institutions like us that are closed to visitors in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, this day comes at a critical time. By making a gift to the Preservation Society Annual Fund this Wednesday, April 1, you will help us to care for our houses and support our staff during this uncertain time, as well as in the year ahead.

Please visit our 401Gives webpage by clicking this link:

www.401gives.org/organizations/the-preservation-society-of-newport-county

We hope we can count on you to support the Preservation Society during this statewide giving day. A gift of any amount will make a difference!
... See MoreSee Less

Today, the Preservation Society is participating in a statewide giving day known as 401Gives. This campaign was created to give Rhode Island’s nonprofit community a collective voice and help deepen the state’s culture of philanthropy.  For cultural institutions like us that are closed to visitors in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, this day comes at a critical time. By making a gift to the Preservation Society Annual Fund this Wednesday, April 1, you will help us to care for our houses and support our staff during this uncertain time, as well as in the year ahead.  Please visit our 401Gives webpage by clicking this link:  https://www.401gives.org/organizations/the-preservation-society-of-newport-county  We hope we can count on you to support the Preservation Society during this statewide giving day. A gift of any amount will make a difference!

Help us document this historic moment in our communities - join us as a Citizen-Historian mailchi.mp/40ac17afff5a/help-us-document-this-historic-moment-in-our-communities ... See MoreSee Less

Help us document this historic moment in our communities - join us as a Citizen-Historian https://mailchi.mp/40ac17afff5a/help-us-document-this-historic-moment-in-our-communities

Happy Census Day!

Today is the day the @uscensusbureau is using to create a snapshot of our nation and it’s people.

Whenever you complete the #2020census, today will be the day you are asked to count the people living (or sleeping) in your home — whether you are related or not.

Now, more than ever, we know how much each member of our community counts. Help ensure all Rhode Islanders are included in this important record by visiting 2020census.gov
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401 Gives Today! Even if you've never given, if you enjoy any aspect of the work that we do, the properties preserved, the stories told, the lessons taught, or the field trips taken - please consider a gift today. Every gift matters, regardless of the amount. Thank you so much! Follow this link, click, give! It's that simple.
bit.ly/2QYPjz0
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401 Gives Today!  Even if youve never given, if you enjoy any aspect of the work that we do, the properties preserved, the stories told, the lessons taught, or the field trips taken - please consider a gift today. Every gift matters, regardless of the amount. Thank you so much! Follow this link, click, give! Its that simple. 
https://bit.ly/2QYPjz0

What. Is. It. Wednesday.

No April Fool's jokes here, just a challenge for you. What is this object? Submit your guesses in the comments!
#WhatIsItWednesday #vthistory #history #historicalobjects #HistoryGames #AprilFools #notreally
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What. Is. It. Wednesday.  No April Fools jokes here, just a challenge for you. What is this object? Submit your guesses in the comments!
#whatisitwednesday #VThistory #history #historicalobjects #historygames #aprilfools #notreally

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I used one made of plastic many years ago. Put yarn on the hooks and with a crochet hook looped the yarn in a pattern and made a "horse rein" - as it was called - that went down the center opening and out the bottom. The "rein" was then sewn into placemats, hats, etc.

I think it's a thing you wrap strings around the hooks on the sides and weave in a circular manner to make rope. The rope comes out the bottom (this is a view of the top). I don't know what they're called, but I've used one.

Mouth piece for a wood wind instrument?

Earpiece for early wall or candlestick telephone.

A door peep hole.

Double-belled euphonium mouthpiece!! 🙂

mouthpiece for a brass instrument - most likely a trumpet.

It’s a stethoscope

Original Duck Dynasty duck call !

Looks like a mouthpiece for an instrument like a trumpet or bugle 🎺

The ear piece from the old candlestick phones?

A cream separator from a milk bottle.

Trumpet mouthpiece.

Mouth piece for horn

A stethoscope.

Flashlight prototype.

duck call.

Wooden stethescope?

Walking clock

No clue😂

Looks like a trumpet mouthpiece

Stethoscope?

Bobbin.

Bobbin spindle

Bobbin

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Tomorrow the Preservation Society will be participating in a statewide giving day known as 401Gives. This campaign was created to give Rhode Island’s nonprofit community a collective voice and help deepen the state’s culture of philanthropy.

For cultural institutions like us that are closed to visitors in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, this day comes at a critical time. By making a gift to the Preservation Society Annual Fund this Wednesday, April 1, you will help us to care for our houses and support our staff during this uncertain time, as well as in the year ahead.

Please visit our 401Gives webpage by clicking this link:

www.401gives.org/organizations/the-preservation-society-of-newport-county

We hope we can count on you to support the Preservation Society during this statewide giving day. A gift of any amount will make a difference!
... See MoreSee Less

Tomorrow the Preservation Society will be participating in a statewide giving day known as 401Gives. This campaign was created to give Rhode Island’s nonprofit community a collective voice and help deepen the state’s culture of philanthropy.  For cultural institutions like us that are closed to visitors in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, this day comes at a critical time. By making a gift to the Preservation Society Annual Fund this Wednesday, April 1, you will help us to care for our houses and support our staff during this uncertain time, as well as in the year ahead.  Please visit our 401Gives webpage by clicking this link:  https://www.401gives.org/organizations/the-preservation-society-of-newport-county  We hope we can count on you to support the Preservation Society during this statewide giving day. A gift of any amount will make a difference!

We really miss being around people too.

📷: RIHS Collections (RHiX173331).

#rhodeislandhistory #rihistory #providence #smithhillpvd #quarantine #socialdistancing
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We really miss being around people too. 
•
📷: RIHS Collections (RHiX173331). 
•
#rhodeislandhistory #rihistory #providence #smithhillpvd #quarantine #socialdistancing

WPRI’s Courtney Carter interviewed Preservation Society CEO Trudy Coxe this morning via Zoom about our remarkable new virtual tours. www.newportmansions.org/exhibitions/virtual-exhibition-tours
Tune in to WPRI 12 Eyewitness News tonight at 5:30 p.m. to see the interview, or visit WPRI.com to watch it after 7 p.m.!
#NewportMansionsFromHome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
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WPRI’s Courtney Carter interviewed Preservation Society CEO Trudy Coxe this morning via Zoom about our remarkable new virtual tours. https://www.newportmansions.org/exhibitions/virtual-exhibition-tours 
Tune in to WPRI 12 Eyewitness News tonight at 5:30 p.m. to see the interview, or visit WPRI.com to watch it after 7 p.m.!
#NewportMansionsFromHome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#NewportMansionsStrong

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Great capture here and virtual 🎥 tours are a wonderful idea... Stay safe and healthy until things get back on track.. Hopefully soon 💝

The Elms virtual tour is amazing.

Wonderful!!!

Needs more class war

Tomorrow is #401Gives Day! Starting at 6am on April 1, you can donate to your favorite local nonprofits to support them through these difficult times. We hope that you consider supporting RIHS in our efforts of honoring, interpreting, and sharing our state’s vibrant history! #401gives #rhodeislandhistory #historyisimportant ... See MoreSee Less

Tomorrow is #401Gives Day! Starting at 6am on April 1, you can donate to your favorite local nonprofits to support them through these difficult times. We hope that you consider supporting RIHS in our efforts of honoring, interpreting, and sharing our state’s vibrant history!  #401gives #rhodeislandhistory #historyisimportant

Chateau-sur-Mer has some of the most impressive interior decoration to be found anywhere in Newport. One highlight is a set of inlaid tiles over one of the fireplaces.? Preservation Society Collections Manager Katherine Garrett-Cox explains their origins and significance.

#newportmansionsfromhome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#newportmansionsstrong
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One of the most striking artifacts in the Millyard Museum is Ashland No. 1, the 1871 Amoskeag steam fire engine that was manufactured right in the Millyard. Learn more in this 'Manchester Moment.'

Click here: vimeopro.com/mpts16/john-clayton-presents-manchester-moments/video/283815855
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Awesome and thank you John Clayton for sharing this video with me .

What is the Old Man of the Mountain? Where was it, and what happened to it? Watch this video to find out all about one of New Hampshire's most beloved symbols. #TeachingTuesday ... See MoreSee Less

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Experiences become more meaningful when they are shared with people who love what you love. Thank you @Barbiebrazda for sharing a Rosecliff memory so perfectly framed and proportioned! ... See MoreSee Less

Experiences become more meaningful when they are shared with people who love what you love.  Thank you @Barbiebrazda for sharing a Rosecliff memory so perfectly framed and proportioned!

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beautiful! My favorite of the Newport Mansions!

Wonderful photo, @Barbiebrazda.

Gorgeous!

Christine Schimpf Carlson

Jennifer Enos Moitoso

There is something missing in this photo... oh yeah it’s class war!

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ENJOY this LIVE CAM view of Bar Harbor, Maine. ... See MoreSee Less

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A little goes a long way when we get together and give together. Join us on April 1 for #401Gives. It's more than a day. It's a movement. ... See MoreSee Less

A little goes a long way when we get together and give together. Join us on April 1 for #401Gives. Its more than a day. Its a movement.

Join us this Friday at 2pm for a virtual coffee hour chat—we'll be talking about Katharine Hepburn, her movies, life in CT, and her brownies! So, get out your mixing bowl and whip up Katharine Hepburn’s brownies (Recipe from the The New York Times below!) with us. We hope to chat with you on Friday 4/3 at 2pm over coffee, tea, and brownies!

See comments for how to join.

KATHARINE HEPBURN'S BROWNIES

1/2 cup cocoa
1 stick butter
2 eggs
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup flour
1 cup broken-up walnuts or pecans
1 teaspoon vanilla
pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Melt butter in a saucepan with cocoa and stir until smooth. Remove from heat and allow to cool for a few minutes. Mix in eggs, one at a time. Add sugar, flour, nuts, vanilla, and salt. Pour into a greased 8x8 square pan. Bake 40 minutes. ''Don't overbake!'' They should be gooey. Let cool (an essential step) and cut into bars.
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Join us this Friday at 2pm for a virtual coffee hour chat—well be talking about Katharine Hepburn, her movies, life in CT, and her brownies! So, get out your mixing bowl and whip up Katharine Hepburn’s brownies (Recipe from the The New York Times below!) with us. We hope to chat with you on Friday 4/3 at 2pm over coffee, tea, and brownies!  See comments for how to join.  KATHARINE HEPBURNS BROWNIES  1/2 cup cocoa
1 stick butter
2 eggs
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup flour
1 cup broken-up walnuts or pecans
1 teaspoon vanilla
pinch of salt  Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Melt butter in a saucepan with cocoa and stir until smooth. Remove from heat and allow to cool for a few minutes. Mix in eggs, one at a time. Add sugar, flour, nuts, vanilla, and salt. Pour into a greased 8x8 square pan. Bake 40 minutes. Dont overbake! They should be gooey. Let cool (an essential step) and cut into bars.

Comment on Facebook

Spencer loved them.

Interested! How does one do this Coffee Hour Chat?

This sounds BRILLIANT

Really There’s a PANDEMIC!!! Out here! Please encourage everyone to Stay home 🏠

Donna Strollo Zentek

Letitia Ewing

Yum.

Carole Shmurak-I made these brownies for my birthday! They’re delicious!!

Connecticut Historical Society is hosting this using zoom. cilc.zoom.us/meeting/register/upUpcu2rqz0rfIpoYXtBF2xAUX6YkWe3gQ

Zoom? Thanks, but no thanks. Two words: Facebook Live.

How can I join?

Will be there! I lovingly run Katharine Hepburn ☺️

Margo Lynn Annie Amsden

Carole Shmurak😁

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Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum updated their profile picture.
Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum

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So nice to see green grass and plants!!! Can't wait for spring!

Spring, wherefore art thou?!?

Bring it On!!!

What's all that green stuff? I vaguely remember it... I think it's called NotSnow 😂

A lovely tribute!Happy Birthday John Willard!

John Willard’s (1892-1976) contributions to Wethersfield were many, and included his work on the Historic District Commission, Park Board, Recreation Committee, Cemetery Association, Historic Foundation, and as the Tree Warden. These volunteer positions coincided with his work as an employee of Comstock, Ferre & Co (1912-57), the nation’s oldest seed company in continuous operation.

John Willard was Wethersfield’s most distinguished modern historian. He was a well-known author and scholar, and possessed the rare abilities of a master storyteller. He was a founding member of the Wethersfield Historical Society in 1932, and served as president from1939-42. He believed that “history is the story of people.”

The common blue violet is one of the most pleasing signs of spring. Read our newest Article from the Community written by John Willard.
www.wethersfieldhistory.org/articles/the-blue-violet/

#JohnWillard #spring #blueviolet #Wethersfield #history
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A lovely tribute!
Melisa Torres added a new photo to Massachusetts Historical Society's timeline.

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Melisa Torres added a new photo to Massachusetts Historical Society's timeline.

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Sure, Manchester was renowned for the manufacture of textiles, but did you know the city was also home to the Amoskeag Locomotive Works? Check out this "Manchester Moment" to learn more...

vimeopro.com/mpts16/john-clayton-presents-manchester-moments/video/283816612
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We had no idea! Thanks for sharing 🙂

If I am not mistaken, there are some old locomotive engines made in Manchester located at Clark’s trading post

At VHS we believe preserving and sharing history builds a stronger community and a better future for everyone. We do this work of tying the past to the present so we can better understand the world in which we live and how we can move forward. Times like these remind us just how important it is to stay connected, not only to each other, but to our roots and the shared history that unites us all.

In the future, people may look back to the way we responded to the pandemic in 2020, just as we look back to 1918. We can't yet know what this pandemic will teach to future generations, but we do know we are forever a part of Vermont history. At VHS we are doing our best to document and preseve the history we already have AND the history we are creating every single day.

The Green Mountain Chronicles is a series of 52 five-minute radio programs created by the Vermont Historical Society between 1987 and 1988. They were broadcast by commercial and public radio stations throughout the state in late 1988 and early 1989. The radio series tells the history of Vermont in the twentieth century using archival sound recordings and oral history interviews.

ow.ly/XvAH50yXyIs

Help us preserve and share Vermont’s rich history and continued legacy through online programming and resources by making a donation today vermonthistory.org/donate
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At VHS we believe preserving and sharing history builds a stronger community and a better future for everyone. We do this work of tying the past to the present so we can better understand the world in which we live and how we can move forward. Times like these remind us just how important it is to stay connected, not only to each other, but to our roots and the shared history that unites us all.  In the future, people may look back to the way we responded to the pandemic in 2020, just as we look back to 1918. We cant yet know what this pandemic will teach to future generations, but we do know we are forever a part of Vermont history. At VHS we are doing our best to document and preseve the history we already have AND the history we are creating every single day.  The Green Mountain Chronicles is a series of 52 five-minute radio programs created by the Vermont Historical Society between 1987 and 1988. They were broadcast by commercial and public radio stations throughout the state in late 1988 and early 1989. The radio series tells the history of Vermont in the twentieth century using archival sound recordings and oral history interviews.  http://ow.ly/XvAH50yXyIs  Help us preserve and share Vermont’s rich history and continued legacy through online programming and resources by making a donation today https://vermonthistory.org/donate

#200forMaine200. CONTACT & CONFLICT: Europeans first arrived in the Gulf of Maine in a series of exploratory voyages from about 1524 to 1613. During this century of exploration, three themes emerged with lasting significance for the history of Maine.

First: In almost every instance, initial relations between English and Native people deteriorated quickly from friendship to suspicion and hostility, suggesting a deep flaw in English diplomatic approaches.

Second: These early voyages projected a false and ultimately dangerous impression of Maine as a New-World paradise where little work would yield great wealth.

Third: They laid the basis for overlapping French and English claims to the Wabanaki homeland that precipitated a 3-way struggle for supremacy or survival that lasted for another century.

These themes – diplomatic failure, false expectations, and imperial claims – explain much about Maine's marginal status as a proprietary colony and later as a province of Massachusetts. More www.mainememory.net/sitebuilder/site/895/page/1306/display and learn about this map from our MHS collections "Nova Belgica et Anglia Nova, ca. 1635."
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#200forMaine200. CONTACT & CONFLICT: Europeans first arrived in the Gulf of Maine in a series of exploratory voyages from about 1524 to 1613. During this century of exploration, three themes emerged with lasting significance for the history of Maine.  First: In almost every instance, initial relations between English and Native people deteriorated quickly from friendship to suspicion and hostility, suggesting a deep flaw in English diplomatic approaches.  Second: These early voyages projected a false and ultimately dangerous impression of Maine as a New-World paradise where little work would yield great wealth.  Third: They laid the basis for overlapping French and English claims to the Wabanaki homeland that precipitated a 3-way struggle for supremacy or survival that lasted for another century.  These themes – diplomatic failure, false expectations, and imperial claims – explain much about Maines marginal status as a proprietary colony and later as a province of Massachusetts. More  www.mainememory.net/sitebuilder/site/895/page/1306/display and learn about this map from our MHS collections Nova Belgica et Anglia Nova, ca. 1635.

From our friends at Greenfield Historical Society! Lenny- you are the best! ... See MoreSee Less

From our friends at Greenfield Historical Society! Lenny- you are the best!

Here’s the latest news from the Manchester Historic Association and Millyard Museum!

conta.cc/2WNL4df
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Here’s the latest news from the Manchester Historic Association and Millyard Museum!  https://conta.cc/2WNL4df

ENJOY this LIVE CAM from Portland Head Light, Cape Elizabeth, Maine. ... See MoreSee Less

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Awesome! Thanks!

People are comparing the corona virus with the 1957 anthrax outbreak in the Millyard at Arms Textile. This 'Manchester Moment' recounts the facts of the case.

vimeopro.com/mpts16/john-clayton-presents-manchester-moments/video/283816322
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This museum is awesome. I really enjoyed going through it last month. Love Manchester history!

Love to have you! Go to www.Manchesterhistoric.org

I need to get a membership.

Can't wait to go there!

Home: Our Current Frontier - https://mailchi.mp/blackheritagetrailnh.org/celebrating-black-history-month-2177437

Ready for a couch concert?! Zikina is a Ugandan folk band who performed at last year's third Thursday summer concert. Here they perform "Tuyimbe." Typically, the concerts are outside on our lawns. It rained last year, but the show went on!

We're looking forward to inviting you back to join us for this summer's concerts—spread a blanket or set up chairs on our lawns, enjoy a picnic dinner or visit the food truck that sets up shop for the evening. Attendees are treated to a musical performance in the warm summer night's air, free of charge! #CCHAP

Learn more about the Connecticut Cultural Heritage Arts Program: bit.ly/CCHAP
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Very nice!🎼

Faithful follower Vicki Hackman Arceci lamented that our "Manchester Moments" videos were so short, so here, we present a full-length guided tour of the Amoskeag Millyard with Executive Director John Clayton. Enjoy!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtpgKq5VkM0
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Bob Belanger you might like this.

We are thrilled to be part of this amazing project!It's here! www.VermontArtOnline.org allows you to explore and discover Vermont's museums & galleries all from the comfort of your home.

Make sure to check back often as more locations come online daily. 🙌

We're so proud to be partner on this project, created by Sarah Briggs and Sarah Laursen of Middlebury College Museum of Art with support from The Vermont Arts Council, Vermont Humanities Council, and Fleming Museum of Art.
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We are thrilled to be part of this amazing project!

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Thank you so much for your support!

Thank you!

#OnThisDay March 25, 1993, Mary Louise Hancock (1920-2017) was awarded Keene State College President's Outstanding Women of New Hampshire Award. Mary Louise Hancock began a career in state politics in 1976, serving as the first woman and Democrat representing Concord in District 15 of the State Senate. She became a force in state politics and an advocate for women's rights. #WomensHistoryMonth

Learn more: www.nhhistory.org/object/746268/medal
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#OnThisDay March 25, 1993, Mary Louise Hancock (1920-2017) was awarded Keene State College Presidents Outstanding Women of New Hampshire Award. Mary Louise Hancock began a career in state politics in 1976, serving as the first woman and Democrat representing Concord in District 15 of the State Senate. She became a force in state politics and an advocate for womens rights. #WomensHistoryMonth  Learn more: https://www.nhhistory.org/object/746268/medal

Becoming a Revolutionary Spaces member gives you the opportunity to connect with the history and continuing practice of democracy through the intertwined stories of two of the nation’s most iconic sites – Boston’s Old South Meeting House and Old State House.

www.revolutionaryspaces.org/membership/As we grapple with uncertainty in this pandemic, we're finding new ways to connect in the chaos. Becoming a Revolutionary Spaces member gives you the opportunity to connect with the history and continuing practice of democracy through the intertwined stories of two of the nation’s most iconic sites – Boston’s Old South Meeting House and Old State House.

While we can't be together in person right now, we're exploring new ways to connect virtually, and will roll out new member-exclusive content soon.

Your support is vital in helping us bring people together, and we couldn't do this without you.

www.revolutionaryspaces.org/membership/
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Becoming a Revolutionary Spaces member gives you the opportunity to connect with the history and continuing practice of democracy through the intertwined stories of two of the nation’s most iconic sites – Boston’s Old South Meeting House and Old State House.  https://www.revolutionaryspaces.org/membership/

"Working at Mercy, a generational experience. A story by Carolyn Bridges in 2018." Healthcare professionals and workers have always been on the front lines of care, courage and compassion here in Maine. In this short video story, Carolyn Bridges described working and teaching at Mercy Hospital for over 40 years. She recounted the dedication, respect, and compassion of the Sisters of Mercy and the Mercy staff. As of 2018, Carolyn's two sons also worked at Mercy. Consider sharing your story on My Maine Stories here: www.mainememory.net/mymainestories/submit ... See MoreSee Less

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It's #TeachingTuesday! Moving from one country to another in the 1800s and early 1900s was very hard, but millions of people still chose to become immigrants and come to the United States to start a new life. This video explains the push factors that made immigrants want to leave their home country and the pull factors that made immigrants want to come to America. For more kid-friendly content on the history of immigration in the Granite State, visit moose.nhhistory.org/units/immigration-in-the-industrial-age ... See MoreSee Less

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For today's #MuseumMonday, we're sharing a favorite object of schoolchildren who visit the "Discovering New Hampshire" exhibition. This sampler was made by 12-year-old Hannah Foster of Canterbury in 1796. The bottom panel, featuring flame-like fir trees, flowers, birds, and a basket in the center, is characteristic of samplers made in Canterbury during that time, including several others in the Society's collections. ... See MoreSee Less

For todays #MuseumMonday, were sharing a favorite object of schoolchildren who visit the Discovering New Hampshire exhibition. This sampler was made by 12-year-old Hannah Foster of Canterbury in 1796. The bottom panel, featuring flame-like fir trees, flowers, birds, and a basket in the center, is characteristic of samplers made in Canterbury during that time, including several others in the Societys collections.

Comment on Facebook

Many also have strawberry borders.

A first in NH! Gloria Browne-Marshall talks about the first known Black male politician in the US - Wentworth Cheswell of Newmarket, NH, elected in 1768 (from 10/13/17).
www.c-span.org/video/?c4861973/user-clip-gloria-browne-marshall
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A first in NH! Gloria Browne-Marshall talks about the first known Black male politician in the US - Wentworth Cheswell of Newmarket, NH, elected in 1768 (from 10/13/17).
https://www.c-span.org/video/?c4861973/user-clip-gloria-browne-marshall

Typically, we'd have a guided tour of our #CTQuilts exhibit today. Since we can't welcome visitors (we miss you!), we're taking the tour online! Join Chief Curator, Ilene Frank, in this impromptu tour of our latest exhibit, "Pieces of American History: Connecticut Quilts."

Leave a comment and let us know what you'd like to learn more about!
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Wow I loved this! Thank you.

I enjoyed this video. Thank you for sharing it.

This was awesome Thanks

Did I miss something? I saw 2 quilts and then a weird screen with music for at least 3 minutes.

Very enjoyable. Thx!

Thanks Very interesting

Amazing!

Bravo!

Claudette Arsenault Flanigan Jayne Lewis Apel thought this might be something you’d both enjoy!

Watched it. The midnight blue quilt was very interesting.

Cindy Sheffs McGinty

Elaine Sullivan

Kathy Cody Vanacoro

Jane Wellbrock

Nadine Blanchett, you might like this.

Peggy Bullard

Maggi Piazza Plevka 😁

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Join us here today at 2pm for a virtual tour of our #ctquilts exhibit! ... See MoreSee Less

Join us here today at 2pm for a virtual tour of our #CTQuilts exhibit!

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Will this continue to be available after this afternoon?

How do I access the video?

Is there a link to the live tour? Or is it just the 5 minute video?

Following

Lorette Bellefleur Cole

Winn Boisseau

Karen Stowell

Sarah Summers

Peggy Bullard

Timna Tarr

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Today we celebrate all the quilters, past and present. Quilting is a skill that produces warm and beautiful results. Quilting has been around for years and is still a favorite hobby of many. This marvelous quilt was made by Maude Robinson. Her husband Lew worked at a cigar factory where they would tie silk ribbons around freshly made cigars. Maude saved the ribbons to create this amazing quilt. #NationalQuiltingDay ... See MoreSee Less

Today we celebrate all the quilters, past and present. Quilting is a skill that produces warm and beautiful results. Quilting has been around for years and is still a favorite hobby of many. This marvelous quilt was made by Maude Robinson. Her husband Lew worked at a cigar factory where they would tie silk ribbons around freshly made cigars. Maude saved the ribbons to create this amazing quilt. #NationalQuiltingDay

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Janet Pownell

Amanda Merrill Jennifer Lemek Blackman

100 years ago, or today? The directions on this poster from the United States Public Health Service have a lot of the same messaging we're seeing today. CHS' Natalie Belanger joined Dennis House on Face The State - WFSB Channel 3 Eyewitness News to talk about some of the similarities and differences between the Spanish Flu of 1918 and #covid_19. bit.ly/392SZGl

Want to hear about something other than #COVID_19? Join us here this Saturday at 2pm for a special virtual tour of our exhibit #ctquilts!

Photo courtesy of the The Library of Congress
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100 years ago, or today? The directions on this poster from the United States Public Health Service have a lot of the same messaging were seeing today. CHS Natalie Belanger joined Dennis House on Face The State - WFSB Channel 3 Eyewitness News to talk about some of the similarities and differences between the Spanish Flu of 1918 and #COVID_19. https://bit.ly/392SZGl  Want to hear about something other than #COVID_19? Join us here this Saturday at 2pm for a special virtual tour of our exhibit #CTQuilts!  Photo courtesy of the The Library of Congress

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Yah and can we not spit on the sidewalk EVER☹️

And I think I saw one suggesting Bars and Saloons should wash glasses with soap and hot water.

Collections department working remotely. This week, the team worked on cataloging a collection of slides and photographs, creating 170+ acquisition records, creating a transcript of a recent oral history interview with a Korean War vet, conducting research on women's suffrage, and transcribing Revolutionary War papers. Doing our part to keep Connecticut History alive. #covid_19 #videocall #virtualmeetings ... See MoreSee Less

Collections department working remotely. This week, the team worked on cataloging a collection of slides and photographs, creating 170+ acquisition records, creating a transcript of a recent oral history interview with a Korean War vet, conducting research on womens suffrage, and transcribing Revolutionary War papers. Doing our part to keep Connecticut History alive. #covid_19 #videocall #virtualmeetings

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Proud of my coworkers for adapting to the challenges of this week.

Well done!👍🏻👍🏻

Friends of WDS: museums across the state need your support! Please take a moment to call your representatives, and, if you do, tell us "Done!" in the comment section below!Advocacy Alert – Urge Your U.S. Legislators to Include Museums in COVID-19 Relief - PLEASE SHARE

CT Humanities is advising you of this advocacy alert from the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH). AASLH is working with American Alliance of Museums and other museum associations to make the case for museums in this time of crisis. Museums of all sizes are experiencing closure, attendance drop-offs, canceled events, and possible or actual layoffs.

Please call your Congressional delegation today and ask for at least $4 billion for nonprofit museums in COVID-19 (coronavirus) economic relief legislation to provide emergency assistance through June.

Read more and take action: cthumanities.org/advocacy-alert-urge-your-u-s-legislators-to-include-museums-in-covid-19-relief/

#coronavirus #advocacy #museum #nonprofit #reliefpackage #economic #congress #legislators #legislation #support #funding
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Friends of WDS: museums across the state need your support! Please take a moment to call your representatives, and, if you do, tell us Done! in the comment section below!
In times of uncertainty, we persevere.  ... - https://mailchi.mp/blackheritagetrailnh.org/celebrating-black-history-month-2120485

As we adjust to this new normal of social distancing, follow Revolutionary Spaces for updates and digital content related to the Old State House and Old South Meeting House! ... See MoreSee Less

The museum may not be open, but the WDS Colonial Revival garden is! Our garden was designed by Amy Cogswell, one of the first female landscape architects in the U.S.! This will likely be the scene later this week. Stop by for a stroll through the garden and a breath of spring! ... See MoreSee Less

The museum may not be open, but the WDS Colonial Revival garden is! Our garden was designed by Amy Cogswell, one of the first female landscape architects in the U.S.! This will likely be the scene later this week. Stop by for a stroll through the garden and a breath of spring!

Happy Birthday, Maine! Today (15 March 2020), marks the 200th anniversary of Maine’s statehood. Maine had been a district of Massachusetts since the 1650s, and though secessionist sentiment was strong in the district from shortly after the Revolution, it was not until 1819 that Massachusetts allowed Maine to become its own state. The move was formalized in 1820 as a part of the Missouri compromise. Read a recent blog post at www.masshist.org/beehiveblog/2020/03/happy-birthday-maine. ... See MoreSee Less

Happy Birthday, Maine! Today (15 March 2020), marks the 200th anniversary of Maine’s statehood.  Maine had been a district of Massachusetts since the 1650s, and though secessionist sentiment was strong in the district from shortly after the Revolution, it was not until 1819 that Massachusetts allowed Maine to become its own state. The move was formalized in 1820 as a part of the Missouri compromise. Read a recent blog post at www.masshist.org/beehiveblog/2020/03/happy-birthday-maine.

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It is a sad day. Reunification is needed. Also, why is the northern part of Maine part of Maine and not Massachusetts. Did Massachusetts agree to give the northern part of Maine to Maine in the Webster-Asburton Treaty. Today is a sad day for Massachusetts.

Patty Osmer

Carly Nightingale Riker

Our closing talk for the #2020teatalks series starts at 2pm today at Temple Israel!

This closing discussion features a group of emerging NH voices that will explore where we are culturally as a state and where we want to be heading.

Will we see you there?!
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Our closing talk for the #2020TeaTalks series starts at 2pm today at Temple Israel!  This closing discussion features a group of emerging NH voices that will explore where we are culturally as a state and where we want to be heading.  Will we see you there?!