History Happens – Try To Keep Up

Historical organizations are all around us in New England
Here are updates from some of our Favorites!

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More utility lines will soon be buried, beautifying the Paradise Valley, Third Beach and Indian Avenue areas of Middletown.

The Scenic Aquidneck Coalition, made up of the Preservation Society, Preserve Rhode Island and the Aquidneck Land Trust, is excited to announce that 77 utility poles will be eliminated along 1.2 miles of roadway in this area. This section of Middletown has been beloved by artists, thinkers and writers since the 18th century and it includes a National Wildlife Refuge and a nonprofit bird sanctuary.

Putting the utility lines underground not only will enhance scenic views, but will also improve resiliency during hurricanes and flooding. More than 90 percent of the project’s $3.8 million cost is being funded through donations from residents in the area as well as a grant from the van Beuren Charitable Foundation. Construction is expected to begin later this month.

We thank the donors who made this effort possible, and salute our partners in the Scenic Aquidneck Coalition.

#NewportMansionsFromHome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
#ThePreservationSocietyofNewportCounty
#RhodeIsland
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More utility lines will soon be buried, beautifying the Paradise Valley, Third Beach and Indian Avenue areas of Middletown. 
The Scenic Aquidneck Coalition, made up of the Preservation Society, Preserve Rhode Island and the Aquidneck Land Trust, is excited to announce that 77 utility poles will be eliminated along 1.2 miles of roadway in this area. This section of Middletown has been beloved by artists, thinkers and writers since the 18th century and it includes a National Wildlife Refuge and a nonprofit bird sanctuary. 
Putting the utility lines underground not only will enhance scenic views, but will also improve resiliency during hurricanes and flooding. More than 90 percent of the project’s $3.8 million cost is being funded through donations from residents in the area as well as a grant from the van Beuren Charitable Foundation. Construction is expected to begin later this month. 
We thank the donors who made this effort possible, and salute our partners in the Scenic Aquidneck Coalition.  #NewportMansionsFromHome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
#ThePreservationSocietyofNewportCounty
#RhodeIsland

This is our shiniest toy in the Millyard Museum. Click to find out the story behind Ashland # 1, one of the finest firefighting machines from the Amoskeag Steam Locomotive Company!

And if you like our 'Manchester Moment' series, please consider becoming a member of the Manchester Historic Association by clicking here: www.manchesterhistoric.org/join-support/membership

vimeopro.com/mpts16/john-clayton-presents-manchester-moments/video/283815855
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It seems like a long time since we welcomed guests to The Breakers. Of course, it’s a small fraction of the nearly 72 years we have been giving tours!

On June 17, 1948, the Preservation Society signed a lease for The Breakers with Countess Szechenyi, née Gladys Moore Vanderbilt, — daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt II — for a token $1 per year, allowing it to open the first floor of the house to the public for paid tours. Less than two weeks later, the first visitors went through the doors. Formerly seen by only a privileged few, the house drew 8,339 visitors in the first month of operation and 26,200 by the end of that first season in late October.

Our founder and longtime President Katherine Warren later reminisced she was worried no one would come! Today, The Breakers has been visited by over 23 million people.

We look forward to welcoming back guests to The Breakers and The Elms soon!

#NewportMansionsFromHome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
#ThePreservationSocietyofNewportCounty
#RhodeIsland
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It seems like a long time since we welcomed guests to The Breakers. Of course, it’s a small fraction of the nearly 72 years we have been giving tours! 
On June 17, 1948, the Preservation Society signed a lease for The Breakers with Countess Szechenyi, née Gladys Moore Vanderbilt, — daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt II — for a token $1 per year, allowing it to open the first floor of the house to the public for paid tours. Less than two weeks later, the first visitors went through the doors. Formerly seen by only a privileged few, the house drew 8,339 visitors in the first month of operation and 26,200 by the end of that first season in late October. 
Our founder and longtime President Katherine Warren later reminisced she was worried no one would come! Today, The Breakers has been visited by over 23 million people.  We look forward to welcoming back guests to The Breakers and The Elms soon!  #NewportMansionsFromHome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
#ThePreservationSocietyofNewportCounty
#RhodeIsland

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Looking forward to coming back!

The Breakers is owned by the Preservation Society of Newport. There was an apartment on the third floor for the relatives of the original owners,but I think that they have given that up lately.

Who owns the breakers now? Does the lease still stand? Is it still in the family?

Follow Revolutionary Spaces for all updates!Silence is violence. As a new organization striving for a just, equitable future, we cannot ignore the injustices Black people in America face every single day.

As a nation, we look to our history to tell us who we are. Too often our founding history has been enlisted to justify inequality and legitimize white supremacy. We cannot allow this to happen any longer. We must recognize and credit the many Black and Brown people who have contributed so much to the ongoing American experiment. While we can’t change the past, we have a duty to tell the truth about the founding of our nation, and we stand committed to exploring this history in new and honest ways.

We know we have work to do as a public history organization striving to be anti-racist in our practices. But we stand here committed to listening, to learning, to growing. This is only the beginning.
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Follow Revolutionary Spaces for all updates!

New video available online! Watch "Lincoln on the Verge: Thirteen Days to Washington" with Ted Widmer, Macaulay Honors College (CUNY). Take a look at upcoming online programs at www.masshist.org/calendar. ... See MoreSee Less

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New video available online! Watch "The Lost Tradition of Economic Equality in America, 1600-1870" with Daniel R. Mandell, Truman State University, and Liz Covart, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture. Take a look at our upcoming online programs at www.masshist.org/calendar. ... See MoreSee Less

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Build the kind of world you want to live in! ... See MoreSee Less

Build the kind of world you want to live in!
Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum updated their profile picture.
Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum

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WDS COVID-19 UPDATE

Although CT museums may be allowed to open on June 20, our first priority is to do everything in our power to keep the WDS family safe and prevent the spread of COVID-19. As much as we anticipate seeing visitors, members and co-workers, our immediate goals are to prepare for reopening at a future date by following state guidelines for operations and the mandatory self-certification process before opening.

Construction of the new Education and Visitor Center remains on schedule with an expected completion date in late July. We continue to work behind the scenes to maintain the property and plan for when we reopen. We are retaining all staff and look forward to their return to a normal work schedule.

We look forward to welcoming you back to WDS at the earliest opportunity! Please do not hesitate to get in touch with questions in the meantime.

Cynthia Riccio
Director of Education
[email protected]
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WDS COVID-19 UPDATE  Although CT museums may be allowed to open on June 20, our first priority is to do everything in our power to keep the WDS family safe and prevent the spread of COVID-19. As much as we anticipate seeing visitors, members and co-workers, our immediate goals are to prepare for reopening at a future date by following state guidelines for operations and the mandatory self-certification process before opening.  Construction of the new Education and Visitor Center remains on schedule with an expected completion date in late July. We continue to work behind the scenes to maintain the property and plan for when we reopen. We are retaining all staff and look forward to their return to a normal work schedule.  We look forward to welcoming you back to WDS at the earliest opportunity! Please do not hesitate to get in touch with questions in the meantime.  Cynthia Riccio
Director of Education
criccio@webb-deane-stevens.org

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can't wait for the grand reopening and the grand opening of the new Center. Drove by yesterday - looking good!!!

The Millyard Museum is proud to be taking part in the NH Center for Non-Profits "NH Gives" Program June 9 and 10.

When those days arrive, please go to this link to make your donation. We need your support now more than ever!

www.nhgives.org/organizations/manchester-historic-association
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The Millyard Museum is proud to be taking part in the NH Center for Non-Profits NH Gives Program June 9 and 10.  When those days arrive, please go to this link to make your donation. We need your support now more than ever!  https://www.nhgives.org/organizations/manchester-historic-association

If you did not see the online unveiling of our new exhibition, "Becoming Vanderbilt," you can watch the video on our YouTube channel by clicking the link below.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XUMUwZFpI4

#NewportMansionsFromHome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
#ThePreservationSocietyofNewportCounty
#RhodeIsland
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If you did not see the online unveiling of our new exhibition, Becoming Vanderbilt, you can watch the video on our YouTube channel by clicking the link below.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XUMUwZFpI4  #NewportMansionsFromHome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
#ThePreservationSocietyofNewportCounty
#RhodeIsland

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Corinne Kruse Have you watched this yet? I need to!

Our next virtual program will be on Thursday, June 18, at 5:30 p.m. with landscape historian Judith Major, who will discuss the pioneering art, architecture, and landscape critic Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer and her life and work in Newport.

To join this Zoom presentation, entitled “The News of Newport: Mrs. Schuyler Van Rensselaer is Expected for the Season,” please send an email, including your full name and the subject line “Judith Major lecture,” to [email protected] or click here, and you will receive information on how to connect.

Click the link to learn more: www.newportmansions.org/learn/adult-programs
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Our next virtual program will be on Thursday, June 18, at 5:30 p.m. with landscape historian Judith Major, who will discuss the pioneering art, architecture, and landscape critic Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer and her life and work in Newport. 
To join this Zoom presentation, entitled “The News of Newport: Mrs. Schuyler Van Rensselaer is Expected for the Season,” please send an email, including your full name and the subject line “Judith Major lecture,” to ProgramRSVP@newportmansions.org or click here, and you will receive information on how to connect.  Click the link to learn more: https://www.newportmansions.org/learn/adult-programs

When the Newport Mansions reopen, all of our guests and employees will be required to wear a face covering. With that in mind, here is a practical option that is re-usable and also supports local business.

This cotton poly-blend nautical chart face mask is double-layered and machine washable. They can be purchased at our Newport Mansions Store at Bannister’s Wharf or online by visiting Newportstyle.net.

#NewportMansionsFromHome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
#ThePreservationSocietyofNewportCounty
#RhodeIsland
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When the Newport Mansions reopen, all of our guests and employees will be required to wear a face covering. With that in mind, here is a practical option that is re-usable and also supports local business.  This cotton poly-blend nautical chart face mask is double-layered and machine washable. They can be purchased at our Newport Mansions Store at Bannister’s Wharf or online by visiting Newportstyle.net.  #NewportMansionsFromHome
#MuseumsFromHome
#AloneTogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
#ThePreservationSocietyofNewportCounty
#RhodeIsland

Let the sun shine! Where is this beautiful loggia located? ... See MoreSee Less

Let the sun shine!  Where is this beautiful loggia located?

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The Breakers! So beautiful!

One of my favorite locations at The Breakers 😍

Elegant 👏

The Breakers!! So gorgeous!!

The Magnificent Breakers!

The Breakers, if I had lived there during the summer, I never would have entered the mansion, I would have lived on this porch all summer.

Whitney Bray you would love this mansion! Road trip? 😎👍

The Breakers...crazy beautiful.

Opening soon!

The Breakers

Press 555 on the audio tour to get your recipe for a White Lady beverage!

Breakers

Breakers

Upper Loggia of The Breakers?

Breakers

The Breakers!!!

The Breakers

Breakers!!

The Breakers!

The Breakers

Breakets

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Local veterans of the Civil War, May 30, 1919 #OTD #OnThisDay ... See MoreSee Less

Local veterans of the Civil War, May 30, 1919 #OTD #Onthisday

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Love this!! Names????

The Breakers and Elms will be reopening soon!

To visit you will need
- to make on-line reservations,
- be safe with facial coverings and social distancing.
- bring your own smart phone and earbuds to play the tours on our mobile app

We'll let you know when!

#alonetogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
#openingsoon
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The Breakers and Elms will be reopening soon!  To visit you will need 
 - to make on-line reservations,
 - be safe with facial coverings and social distancing. 
 - bring your own smart phone and earbuds to play the tours on our mobile app  Well let you know when!  #Alonetogether
#NewportMansionsStrong
#openingsoon

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Looking forward to visiting again soon.

What a wonderful news ☺️

Just curious, why can't all the houses be open...using safe practices. Driving over 1,000 miles to visit and seeing all in one trip would be wonderful.

Abby Robtoy

Save the weekend! #Juneteenth2020 is coming up and we’ve got several virtual events planned from June 18th-20th to celebrate, including Cooking with Selina Choate: A Soul Food Cooking Show! Head to our website for more info and we hope to see you there!
ow.ly/ud1450zT2Fz
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Save the weekend! #Juneteenth2020 is coming up and we’ve got several virtual events planned from June 18th-20th to celebrate, including Cooking with Selina Choate: A Soul Food Cooking Show! Head to our website for more info and we hope to see you there! 
http://ow.ly/ud1450zT2Fz

Here’s Dan Comly, one of our fantastic tour guides, on why he’s passionate about #BHTNH. We’d love to hear from you too - what do you love about the Black Heritage Trail of NH?

And please do consider supporting us for #NHGives, coming up on June 9-10!
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Here’s Dan Comly, one of our fantastic tour guides, on why he’s passionate about #BHTNH. We’d love to hear from you too - what do you love about the Black Heritage Trail of NH?  And please do consider supporting us for #NHGives, coming up on June 9-10!

No words. Read our current newsletter to see how we are feeling and what we are up to. - mailchi.mp/blackheritagetrailnh.org/celebrating-black-history-month-2538669 ... See MoreSee Less

No words. Read our current newsletter to see how we are feeling and what we are up to. - https://mailchi.mp/blackheritagetrailnh.org/celebrating-black-history-month-2538669

Please save the date for #NHGives, 24-hours to celebrate giving across New Hampshire! The clock starts at 6pm on June 9th! ... See MoreSee Less

Please save the date for #NHGives, 24-hours to celebrate giving across New Hampshire! The clock starts at 6pm on June 9th!

Here's some news from the Manchester Historic Association, including the election of four new board members!

conta.cc/2X7XOLK
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Heres some news from the Manchester Historic Association, including the election of four new board members!  https://conta.cc/2X7XOLK

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No explanation on this photo?

Here it is today. You can live here.

The Amoskeag Bank building?

Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum updated their profile picture.
Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum

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Today we debut the first of our periodic WDS Digging Deeper Video Series! Intrepid tour guide and educator Will Conard-Malley offers bits of wisdom on life in the three historic houses comprising the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum. We'd love to get your feedback below! www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0ZYnu1bqec ... See MoreSee Less

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Nice job. It’s interesting to see that advertising was considered front page news.

Very interesting - how did they get the newspapers - were they delivered?

"Grace Darling," an omnibus in the collection of The Long Island Museum, was built by the Concord Carriage Company in Concord, NH, in 1880. Painted by John Burgum, who recorded it took 142 hours to paint, the carriage was originally used in S.P. Huntress's livery business in South Berwick, ME. Learn more about the history of the "Grace Darling," it's restoration, and see our portrait of John Burgum featured in the virtual tour below! www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJNbIoWv0To&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR0WQBcyhA2PfyKnjxeGg0nXKPPzeyK1ErK... ... See MoreSee Less

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Check out our catalog for more information on our portrait of John Burgum: www.nhhistory.org/object/142327/painting

Teach your kids about everyone's favorite sea monster, Champ, with the resources for children and families on our website. You'll learn about Lake Champlain, the history of the Champ legend, and make your own version of Champ, like this 1959 sock puppet from our collection.
buff.ly/2B7Kiix
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Teach your kids about everyones favorite sea monster, Champ, with the resources for children and families on our website. Youll learn about Lake Champlain, the history of the Champ legend, and make your own version of Champ, like this 1959 sock puppet from our collection.
https://buff.ly/2B7Kiix

Do you have a Central High student who's missing out on graduation? How about this gorgeous rendering of the Abraham Lincoln statue as a graduation gift?

Click here to order: www.manchesterhistoric.org/museum-shop/ornaments

Shipping and handling is included. Please allow seven days for delivery.
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Do you have a Central High student whos missing out on graduation? How about this gorgeous rendering of the Abraham Lincoln statue as a graduation gift? 
Click here to order: https://www.manchesterhistoric.org/museum-shop/ornaments  Shipping and handling is included. Please allow seven days for delivery.

Did you know every family has a unique history? How can you uncover the stories of your ancestors? Tune into this episode of Kat's Creative Corner to find out! Then, work together to create a family tree! Visit our blog for the link to the activity: chs.org/blog-2/ ... See MoreSee Less

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A challenge for this very warm Wednesday: what is this object from our collection? Comment with your answers!
#history #vthistory #HistoryGames #museum #MuseumFromHome #historyathome #museumandchill #WhatIsItWednesday
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A challenge for this very warm Wednesday:  what is this object from our collection? Comment with your answers! 
#history #VThistory #historygames #museum #museumfromhome #historyathome #museumandchill #whatisitwednesday

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This one was too easy for you history buffs! It's a blue metal electric hair dryer on a stand. The dryer detaches from the stand to become a hand-held model. There are two switches, one for ON/OFF and one for HOT/COLD. A metal plate attached to the hand-held piece identifies this as a HANDY-HANNAH electric Hair dryer from the Standard Products Corp, Whitman, Mass. Gift of Olive Romerio Franzi of Barre, VT.

If a hair dryer, did it have a hose attached to a head covering? Like in salons- those boofy bits that get all puffed up while blowing hot air on your head? Lol

Not that different from the hair dryer my Mom used for 20 years!

I quess hair dryer but that seems to easy. So. Maybe a speaker of some sort

I have one, it was my mom's. A hair dryer.

Hair dryer, but also served really well to thaw frozen pipes

For thawing car door locks after the ice storm.

Early air conditioning unit. Place bowl of ice in front of the vents, plug in, fan inside blows cooler air out the nozzle?

I’m guessing a hair dryer, but it could totally be a fan. Maybe coupled with an ice box to provide AC?

An air moving device.

Early hand held hair dryer.

Hair dryer...had one!

Telephone switchboard operator handset

Hair dryer ?

Hair dryer?

hair dryer?

Hair dryer?

fireplace blower?

.

An early hand held hair dryer. I've one from the 1920s.

Hair dryer

Hair dryer

Hair dryer

Hair dryer

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Trivia Tuesday! 
#TriviaTuesday #MonadnockHistory #MonadnockCenter #MonadnockTrivia

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Peterborough Town Library is the first library supported by taxation in the world! The Rev. Abiel Abbot led the effort to found the library in 1833. At first books were kept in a local store. In 1873 the collection moved to the Town House. By 1890, George Shattuck Morison was designing a new dedicated library building. Today the library is about to undergo a restoration and renovation to build a new library for the 21st century!

Our wonderful library, of course

Publicly funded public library.

The Library...

Yup

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Did you know that during the Civil War, the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company produced rifles for the Union Army?

Watch this, and if you're enjoying our 'Manchester Moments,' please consider becoming a member of the Manchester Historic Association! www.manchesterhistoric.org/join-support/membership

vimeopro.com/mpts16/john-clayton-presents-manchester-moments/video/283815663
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That was how the Amoskeak Co survived during the war.

Awesome civil war video

Yes

Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire is in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire

#DidYouKnow Many early celebrations of the Emancipation Proclamation, funded by a grant from Unitarian minister, Rev. Daniel Austin, were held in South Ward Hall, this building on Marcy Street was also the first home of People’s Baptist Church, the only Black church in New Hampshire until the mid-twentieth century. The congregation met here from the early 1890s until 1915, when they moved into their own church on Pearl Street. ... See MoreSee Less

#DidYouKnow Many early celebrations of the Emancipation Proclamation, funded by a grant from Unitarian minister, Rev. Daniel Austin, were held in South Ward Hall, this building on Marcy Street was also the first home of People’s Baptist Church, the only Black church in New Hampshire until the mid-twentieth century. The congregation met here from the early 1890s until 1915, when they moved into their own church on Pearl Street.

Curious about learning your family's history but don't know where to start? Join our virtual Summer Genealogy Workshop Series and learn the basics needed to kickstart your research! Complete individual workshops or the entire series. Each workshop is 90 minutes on Zoom. Limited online consultations appointments will be offered following each class.
Free for VHS and VT Genealogy Library Members. $10/session or $25/series for non-members.

Saturday, June 13: "Genealogy 101"
Saturday, July 11: "Using DNA for Genealogy"
Saturday, August 8: "Using Newspapers for Genealogy"

Check out our website to learn more and register: buff.ly/3d7QUeQ

*These workshops are provided at low rates thanks to the support of a generous donor whose passion for genealogy spans over 35 years.
... See MoreSee Less

Curious about learning your familys history but dont know where to start? Join our virtual Summer Genealogy Workshop Series and learn the basics needed to kickstart your research! Complete individual workshops or the entire series. Each workshop is 90 minutes on Zoom. Limited online consultations appointments will be offered following each class.
Free for VHS and VT Genealogy Library Members. $10/session or $25/series for non-members.  Saturday, June 13: Genealogy 101
Saturday, July 11: Using DNA for Genealogy
Saturday, August 8: Using Newspapers for Genealogy  Check out our website to learn more and  register: https://buff.ly/3d7QUeQ  *These workshops are provided at low rates thanks to the support of a generous donor whose passion for genealogy spans over 35 years.

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Douglas Ordway

Today, and everyday, we remember and honor the men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice while serving our country. #MemorialDay ... See MoreSee Less

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They need to repair that hole once and for all

🇺🇸

Remember those who gave all on this Memorial Day ... See MoreSee Less

Remember those who gave all on this Memorial Day

Today we give honor & thanks to our servicemen and women who died for our country, making the ultimate sacrifice to protect our nation. ... See MoreSee Less

Today we give honor & thanks to our servicemen and women who died for our country, making the ultimate sacrifice to protect our nation.

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Thank you

🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

Happy 100th Birthday Dublin Historical Society!It was 100 years ago today that Articles of Agreement were filed with the Secretary of State in Concord, creating the Dublin Historical Society as a legal body corporate in the State of New Hampshire. ... See MoreSee Less

Happy 100th Birthday Dublin Historical Society!

For today's #sharingSaturday and in honor of Memorial Day, we are sharing the story of the Yankee Division and the Ground War in Europe, 1917-1918, a program originally presented and recorded in 2017 as part of the Society's spring lecture series, "New Hampshire and the Great War." This lecture was delivered by Professor Hugh Dubrulle of the St. Anselm College History Department. ... See MoreSee Less

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Recycling at its best! Peterborough Town Library had lots of archival boxes they didn't need anymore and let us have our pick- we won't need to buy large boxes for a while! ... See MoreSee Less

Recycling at its best! Peterborough Town Library had lots of archival boxes they didnt need anymore and let us have our pick- we wont need to buy large boxes for a while!
Blowing in the wind. Ways to find answers and joy- https://mailchi.mp/blackheritagetrailnh.org/celebrating-black-history-month-2487865

The Andrews Sisters sang it best: "I'm a patriotic jitterbug, yeah, yeah, that's what I am."

If you'd like a reason to get all dolled up and get in the swing of things, consider joining us on Thursday for Showtime on the Homefront, a virtual shindig celebrating the performing arts of WWII. We have a full lineup of stars to keep you entertained, with the vocal stylings of Wensday, dance performances and how-tos with CHIFFEROBE, and a costume contest judged by Haley Star. All partygoers will also receive a package featuring food and drink recipes, playlists, printable decorations and much more to get you in the spirit. Plus, you can request a private breakout room for you and your pals to enjoy games, drinks, and trivia.

So, get your tickets today at www.rihs.org/buy-tickets/
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Are you playing cards a bit more these days? We celebrate National Solitaire Day with this deck of playing cards used by Albert G. Walker (1836-1902), from Glastonbury, who was a successful magician in the mid 19th century. (Read more about him at bit.ly/3girygC). The cards were made by the L. I. Cohen company. Lewis I. Cohen was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, but moved to London, England in 1814. Here he was apprenticed to his half-brother Solomon Cohen who had a business manufacturing pencils. In 1819 he returned to the USA and quickly made a name for himself as the first American to make lead pencils and for introducing steel pens to the USA. However, Cohen's greatest achievement was in developing playing card manufacture through mechanized color printing. He published his first deck in 1832. He was one of the pioneers of printing four colors in one pass, registering his color-printing machine in 1835. Lewis Cohen retired in 1845 and the company eventually became the New York Consolidated Card Company.
So, grab your deck of cards and deal yourself a hand of solitaire.
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Are you playing cards a bit more these days? We celebrate National Solitaire Day with this deck of playing cards used by Albert G. Walker (1836-1902), from Glastonbury, who was a successful magician in the mid 19th century. (Read more about him at https://bit.ly/3girygC). The cards were made by the L. I. Cohen company. Lewis I. Cohen was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, but moved to London, England in 1814. Here he was apprenticed to his half-brother Solomon Cohen who had a business manufacturing pencils. In 1819 he returned to the USA and quickly made a name for himself as the first American to make lead pencils and for introducing steel pens to the USA. However, Cohens greatest achievement was in developing playing card manufacture through mechanized color printing. He published his first deck in 1832. He was one of the pioneers of printing four colors in one pass, registering his color-printing machine in 1835. Lewis Cohen retired in 1845 and the company eventually became the New York Consolidated Card Company.
So, grab your deck of cards and deal yourself a hand of solitaire.

*Just 1 week until*: **Showtime On the Homefront!** Get your tickets now for our virtual shindig at: www.rihs.org/event/showtime/ .
We will travel back to the 1940s to enjoy archival film footage, a vignette collections tour, silent art auction, Rhode Island trivia, and much more while supporting the enduring work of the RIHS. Pictured here is part of the WWII efforts to be found in the Girls’ City Club (GCC) of Providence collection (MSS 438) [RhiX173637]
YOU make our work possible.
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*Just 1 week until*: **Showtime On the Homefront!** Get your tickets now for our virtual shindig at: https://www.rihs.org/event/showtime/ . 
We will travel back to the 1940s to enjoy archival film footage, a vignette collections tour, silent art auction, Rhode Island trivia, and much more while supporting the enduring work of the RIHS. Pictured here is part of the WWII efforts to be found in the Girls’ City Club (GCC) of Providence collection (MSS 438) [RhiX173637] 
YOU make our work possible.

This Connecticut Folklife video takes us into Kunga Choekyi's kitchen, where she walks us through the process of making two kinds of Tibetan momo: Garlic Chive Momo (Chu-tse Momo) and Beef Momo (Sha Momo). Have you ever eaten a Tibetan steamed dumpling here in Connecticut? Do you think you'll try to make one now? #FolkloreThursday #foodways #folklife ... See MoreSee Less

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KC Kunga - this is you!! Tenzin Chokyi, Tse Yangchen, Tentso Sichoe

This #ThrowbackThursday, with Memorial Day coming up, we are heading back to Memorial Day, 1896. This photograph, part of the George W. Perry Scrapbooks, shows a group of unidentified boys and men on horseback at the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) lot at Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord, NH. Learn more at: www.nhhistory.org/object/747576/memorial-day-1896 ... See MoreSee Less

This #ThrowbackThursday, with Memorial Day coming up, we are heading back to Memorial Day, 1896. This photograph, part of the George W. Perry Scrapbooks, shows a group of unidentified boys and men on horseback at the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) lot at Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord, NH. Learn more at: https://www.nhhistory.org/object/747576/memorial-day-1896

Ready for some midweek motivation? Today is National Be a Millionaire Day and we are sharing the story of Rhode Island’s first Irish millionaire, a true rags-to-riches story: Joseph Banigan!

Banigan was born in Ireland in 1839. Eight years later, he immigrated to the United States with his family as they fled the Irish potato famine. After only a year of American schooling, he joined the child labor force full-time. By his late twenties, Banigan had devised a way around Charles Goodyear’s rubber vulcanization patient and had gone into the rubber-making business with $100,000 of crowd-funded capitol.

With Banigan at the helm, the Woonsocket Rubber Co. became the leading rubber manufacturer in the country, due in large part to his progressive policies and modern production techniques. He built Alice Mill in Woonsocket to house part of his production facilities and named it after his mother. Banigan sold the enterprise to United States Rubber Company in 1893 for a whopping $9,000,000. In exchange, he became president of US Rubber Co., a position he held for three years. After butting heads with the rest of the board, he left the conglomerate to, once again, create his own rubber company: Joseph Bannigan Rubber Co. That same year, he constructed the Banigan Building on Weybosset Street in Providence, which was RI’s first skyscraper!

Joseph Banigan was more than just a business tycoon; he was a lauded philanthropist. He helped establish the Home for the Aged Poor, St. Vincent De Paul Infant Asylum, St Joseph's Hospital, and St. Maria's Home for Working Girls. He contributed large endowments to Catholic University and Brown University. He also provided Irish immigrants, like him, with a helping hand in Yankee Rhode Island. He routinely hired Irish-Americans and treated them with respect they seldom saw outside his establishments. Banigan’s philanthropy was recognized by Pope Leo XIII in 1885 when he was named a Knight of Saint Gregory. By the time Joseph Banigan died in 1898, he had left an indelible mark on the state of Rhode Island that can still be seen to this day!
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Ready for some midweek motivation? Today is National Be a Millionaire Day and we are sharing the story of Rhode Island’s first Irish millionaire, a true rags-to-riches story: Joseph Banigan! 
Banigan was born in Ireland in 1839. Eight years later, he immigrated to the United States with his family as they fled the Irish potato famine. After only a year of American schooling, he joined the child labor force full-time. By his late twenties, Banigan had devised a way around Charles Goodyear’s rubber vulcanization patient and had gone into the rubber-making business with $100,000 of crowd-funded capitol.  With Banigan at the helm, the Woonsocket Rubber Co. became the leading rubber manufacturer in the country, due in large part to his progressive policies and modern production techniques. He built Alice Mill in Woonsocket to house part of his production facilities and named it after his mother. Banigan sold the enterprise to United States Rubber Company in 1893 for a whopping $9,000,000. In exchange, he became president of US Rubber Co., a position he held for three years. After butting heads with the rest of the board, he left the conglomerate to, once again, create his own rubber company: Joseph Bannigan Rubber Co. That same year, he constructed the Banigan Building on Weybosset Street in Providence, which was RI’s first skyscraper! 
Joseph Banigan was more than just a business tycoon; he was a lauded philanthropist. He helped establish the Home for the Aged Poor, St. Vincent De Paul Infant Asylum, St Josephs Hospital, and St. Marias Home for Working Girls. He contributed large endowments to Catholic University and Brown University. He also provided Irish immigrants, like him, with a helping hand in Yankee Rhode Island. He routinely hired Irish-Americans and treated them with respect they seldom saw outside his establishments. Banigan’s philanthropy was recognized by Pope Leo XIII in 1885 when he was named a Knight of Saint Gregory. By the time Joseph Banigan died in 1898, he had left an indelible mark on the state of Rhode Island that can still be seen to this day!

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Debbie Downer here. Any honest review of history would include some context. The riches that came about from rubber manufacturing were either directly or indirectly tied to forced labor in Africa (Belgian Congo) and elsewhere. Behind every millionaire, no matter how sincere in their philanthropy, there lies the ripple effects of an extraction economy. Look for heroes and admire them for their virtuous acts, but always remember there's probably more to the story.

All homeowners in Rhode Island are millionaires! Otherwise you couldn't afford the home. Let's face it if you make 50 Grand a year in 20 years you're a millionaire

He was instrumental in helping my great grandfather and brothers . My great grand uncle became an attorney and city councilman because of him.

Scott Molly’s biography, “Irish Titan, Irish Toilers” was excellent.

Nice quick coverage of a part of Rhode Island history, makes one eager to know more.

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Imagine you were a kid 70 years ago! What toys would you have played with? Would they be the same as your toys today? Tune into this episode of Objects Tell Stories to explore some popular toys from the 1950s and 1960s and discover what they can tell us about the past! Visit bit.ly/2ZnxezC to download our homemade Silly Putty recipe! ... See MoreSee Less

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Loved all the education staff and friends who made guest appearances on this episode.

Is that Rebecca? I don’t remember her name. But I have met her. She is a very nice person 👍

On This Day in History, 1943:

On May 19, 1943, Prime Minister Winston Churchill delivered his second speech to a joint session of the United States Congress. He was in Washington for the third Washington Conference, which lasted from May 12–25, 1943.

In the speech, Churchill pledged full British support in the war against Japan. He also warned that the real danger facing the Allies was the “dragging out of the war at enormous expense.”

Later that day, Churchill and President Franklin Roosevelt met at the White House, where they agreed on May 1, 1944 as the date for the D-Day Invasion of France (though this date would be delayed just over a month to June 6, 1944).
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On This Day in History, 1943:  On May 19, 1943, Prime Minister Winston Churchill delivered his second speech to a joint session of the United States Congress. He was in Washington for the third Washington Conference, which lasted from May 12–25, 1943.  In the speech, Churchill pledged full British support in the war against Japan. He also warned that the real danger facing the Allies was the “dragging out of the war at enormous expense.”  Later that day, Churchill and President Franklin Roosevelt met at the White House, where they agreed on May 1, 1944 as the date for the D-Day Invasion of France (though this date would be delayed just over a month to June 6, 1944).

This week’s #MuseumMonday features the Port Royal Band Books: 21 volumes of handwritten music used by the Port Royal Band between 1861 and 1865. In July 1861, Gustavus W. Ingalls was commissioned to organize a band for the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment. It became one of the most famous Civil War ensembles, now best remembered as the Port Royal Band, due to an extensive duty tour at Port Royal Island, SC. This page is from the 1st Eb Cornet Post Band, No 2., LMC. Learn more at: www.nhhistory.org/object/303678/1st-eb-cornet-post-band-no-2-lmc ... See MoreSee Less

This week’s #MuseumMonday features the Port Royal Band Books: 21 volumes of handwritten music used by the Port Royal Band between 1861 and 1865. In July 1861, Gustavus W. Ingalls was commissioned to organize a band for the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment. It became one of the most famous Civil War ensembles, now best remembered as the Port Royal Band, due to an extensive duty tour at Port Royal Island, SC. This page is from the 1st Eb Cornet Post Band, No 2., LMC. Learn more at: https://www.nhhistory.org/object/303678/1st-eb-cornet-post-band-no-2-lmc