History Happens – Try To Keep Up

Historical organizations are all around us in New England
Here are updates from some of our Favorites!

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Experience the Servant Life Tour www.newportmansions.org/plan-a-visit/servant-life-tour at The Elms and learn about some of the men and women who worked behind the scenes servicing the Newport social whirl during the Gilded Age. Tour space is limited (15 spots), so advanced reservations are recommended. ... See MoreSee Less

Experience the Servant Life Tour https://www.newportmansions.org/plan-a-visit/servant-life-tour at The Elms and learn about some of the men and women who worked behind the scenes servicing the Newport social whirl during the Gilded Age. Tour space is limited (15 spots), so advanced reservations are recommended.

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I would recommend this; makes your visit complete.

This is an amazing tour that I have done many times. If you get the chance take this tour you won’t be disappointed, especially once you are on the roof!

Loved it

Bernard Romans is the Revolutionary War Patriot you probably don’t know. A Dutchman who explored North America in the mid-1700s, he was commissioned by the British to map their colonies. But as the colonies headed to revolution, so did Bernard, who joined the Continental Army. Yet, his maps, valuable military intelligence, stayed in the hands of British officers. Bernard became a prisoner of war and his disappearance at sea led his widow to question if he was murdered.

Follow the life journey of Bernard Romans when you visit the exhibit, #WarMapsMystery, on view now through May 2!
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Bernard Romans is the Revolutionary War Patriot you probably don’t know. A Dutchman who explored North America in the mid-1700s, he was commissioned by the British to map their colonies. But as the colonies headed to revolution, so did Bernard, who joined the Continental Army. Yet, his maps, valuable military intelligence, stayed in the hands of British officers. Bernard became a prisoner of war and his disappearance at sea led his widow to question if he was murdered.  Follow the life journey of Bernard Romans when you visit the exhibit, #WarMapsMystery, on view now through May 2!

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Saw it yesterday, such an interesting exhibit! 😊

Worth the trip!

Looks like a good program for the Civil War buff! At GEP Dodge Library in Bennington! ... See MoreSee Less

Looks like a good program for the Civil War buff! At GEP Dodge Library in Bennington!

The road coach Venture (c. 1900) was made by Brewster & Co. of New York. This style of carriage was used for public conveyance in England for almost 50 years, prior to the advent of the railroad. The Venture and the Viking -- another road coach -- were used by Alfred G. Vanderbilt. A coaching enthusiast, he drove both on the London-Brighton road between 1908 and 1914. You can see them this summer when you visit The Breakers Stable & Carriage House. ... See MoreSee Less

The road coach Venture (c. 1900) was made by Brewster & Co. of New York. This style of carriage was used for public conveyance in England for almost 50 years, prior to the advent of the railroad. The Venture and the Viking -- another road coach -- were used by Alfred G. Vanderbilt. A coaching enthusiast, he drove both on the London-Brighton road between 1908 and 1914. You can see them this summer when you visit The Breakers Stable & Carriage House.

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The restoration of The Breakers Stable & Carriage House is really something to see. The horses that got to live there were living the good life.

A Legacy Worth Remembering - https://mailchi.mp/a07f0338e95b/celebrating-black-history-month-1824701

A pair of 18th-century Goddard carved mahogany side chairs is coming back home to Newport.

We are thrilled to have been the successful bidder on these fine chairs during today’s “Important American Furniture, Folk Art and Silver” auction at Christie’s New York. They are believed to have been made in Newport around 1770 by either John or Daniel Goddard on a commission by Christopher Champlin of Newport, a merchant and financier.

These chairs were included in a 1953 exhibition at Hunter House organized by the late Ralph E. Carpenter Jr. and were in his private collection. We believe they were part of an original set of 10 chairs; with this acquisition, the Preservation Society now has six of them in our collections.

We hope that careful conservation study will yield clues about the original upholstery, among other questions. Eventually, the chairs will be placed once again in Hunter House – a welcome addition to its excellent collection of Colonial furniture.
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A pair of 18th-century Goddard carved mahogany side chairs is coming back home to Newport.  We are thrilled to have been the successful bidder on these fine chairs during today’s “Important American Furniture, Folk Art and Silver” auction at Christie’s New York. They are believed to have been made in Newport around 1770 by either John or Daniel Goddard on a commission by Christopher Champlin of Newport, a merchant and financier.  These chairs were included in a 1953 exhibition at Hunter House organized by the late Ralph E. Carpenter Jr. and were in his private collection. We believe they were part of an original set of 10 chairs; with this acquisition, the Preservation Society now has six of them in our collections.  We hope that careful conservation study will yield clues about the original upholstery, among other questions. Eventually, the chairs will be placed once again in Hunter House – a welcome addition to its excellent collection of Colonial furniture.

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I love these stories of treasures returning home, great news!

Get you a Vermonter who can do it all #dollypartonchallenge #vthistory #calvincoolidge #silentcal

Happy Friday! We could not resist trying out the #dollypartonchallenge with New Hampshire's own John Stark. ... See MoreSee Less

Happy Friday! We could not resist trying out the #dollypartonchallenge with New Hampshires own John Stark.

More good things happening in Bass Hall!Pro tip if you are involved in a local / regional nonprofit: attend the Monadnock Nonprofit Network meetings! This group of local leaders are there to hear about your challenges and are ready to collaborate, solve problems, and advance common interests. This one took place earlier today in Bass Hall at Monadnock Center for History and Culture! We have an amazing community of nonprofit organizations, and a robust base of support for them in our region. This group is also part of the larger Economic Ecovation hub, where a representive from the Nonprofit Network reports to a central hub featuring representatives from the arts, local merchants, food/agriculture, sustainability, manufacturing, and more. It's a great model for opening up communication and forming more symbiotic relationships across sectors! ... See MoreSee Less

More good things happening in Bass Hall!

Thanks to John Hays, deputy chairman at Christie’s, for showing a group of Preservation Society supporters around the Ralph E. Carpenter Jr. collection of furniture and decorative objects that will be up for auction tomorrow morning in New York City.

Ralph Carpenter was a superb collector and assisted the Preservation Society in many ways: creating a temporary exhibition at Hunter House in the early 1950s; gifting to the society several very important objects that are on display at Hunter House; helping start the Newport Symposium; and taking groups of collectors on international trips under the banner head of the Philosophes.

Because Hays is one of the nation’s leading experts on American furniture and was a close friend to Carpenter, he was the perfect person to lead the preview tour at Christie’s auction house on Wednesday. We expect the auction, which will come at the conclusion of New York’s Americana Week, will be a great success.
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Thanks to John Hays, deputy chairman at Christie’s, for showing a group of Preservation Society supporters around the Ralph E. Carpenter Jr. collection of furniture and decorative objects that will be up for auction tomorrow morning in New York City.  Ralph Carpenter was a superb collector and assisted the Preservation Society in many ways: creating a temporary exhibition at Hunter House in the early 1950s; gifting to the society several very important objects that are on display at Hunter House; helping start the Newport Symposium; and taking groups of collectors on international trips under the banner head of the Philosophes.  Because Hays is one of the nation’s leading experts on American furniture and was a close friend to Carpenter, he was the perfect person to lead the preview tour at Christie’s auction house on Wednesday. We expect the auction, which will come at the conclusion of New York’s Americana Week, will be a great success.

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Is there anything in particular that the PSNC is looking for at the auction?

Now available in the Millyard Museum Gift Shop, just in time for the First in the Nation Presidential Primary: "Lion of the NH Senate; Thoughts for Presidential Hopefuls," by Sen. Lou D'Allesandro.

Free admission to the Millyard Museum with your book purchase! Perfect chance to explore our exhibit, "Manchester and the Path to the Presidency."
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Now available in the Millyard Museum Gift Shop, just in time for the First in the Nation Presidential Primary: Lion of the NH Senate; Thoughts for Presidential Hopefuls, by Sen. Lou DAllesandro.  Free admission to the Millyard Museum with your book purchase! Perfect chance to explore our exhibit, Manchester and the Path to the Presidency.

Each winter, some of our trees get a little trim to keep their outward growth in check and retain their shape. Arborists with Bartlett Tree Experts have been working on European beech, ginkgo and katsura trees on the grounds of The Elms, shearing off new shoots that grew during the past year around the perimeter of each tree’s canopy.

The European beech in this photo is original to the property, making it more than 100 years old, but it keeps its smoothly rounded shape thanks to this annual care.
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Each winter, some of our trees get a little trim to keep their outward growth in check and retain their shape. Arborists with Bartlett Tree Experts have been working on European beech, ginkgo and katsura trees on the grounds of The Elms, shearing off new shoots that grew during the past year around the perimeter of each tree’s canopy.  The European beech in this photo is original to the property, making it more than 100 years old, but it keeps its smoothly rounded shape thanks to this annual care.

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They do a fantastic job on these beautiful trees.

One of my favorite photos I took last year was of these trees! They are amazing.

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Millyard Museum

Lollipops, anyone?Here's the legend of the lollipops! ... See MoreSee Less

Lollipops, anyone?

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I remember the " lollipop" sculpture very well. It was never a favorite but I wish the mall had prospered and survived. What I remember when I last visited was the sculpture was gone and that the mall was empty!!

I have a vague memory of large wooden blocks that formed a pyramid that I climbed on that was outside of a Ground Round...was that in Hampshire Plaza or am I thinking of a different location?

as I mentioned once before, for all those that have great nostalgia for the piece, can go look at another in the series at the Smithsonian. The companion or twin was installed in 75 at 100 Summer Street in Boston. when the building was sold much like the Manchester property that lollipop was heaved as well. But in Boston there was more art awareness and a new location was found. whatever happened to the Manchester piece? does anybody know

Lost this mall. It was a great place for little shops

I remember Ground Round but I don’t remember Friendly’s?

In remember going with my family

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We’re going to test your deciphering skills on this #whatisitwednesday Happy guessing! ... See MoreSee Less

We’re going to test your deciphering skills on this #whatisitwednesday Happy guessing!

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Well, those were easier to read then we thought. They are tokens for the Windsor-Cornish covered bridge, which was a toll road up until 1943 (though these came into our collection in 1935). We recently visited the bridge for a segment of our This Place in History program with Local 22 & Local 44 www.mychamplainvalley.com/news/vt-history/this-place-in-history-cornish-windsor-covered-bridge/

The original EZPass...🤓

Toll token pre-1936 when NH bought bridge. Toll for going TO NH where you could buy liquor was less than return to Dry Windsor I think.

Toll token to “Pass the Bearer at Cornish Bridge.”

It’s a toll pass for the Cornish Windsor Bridge

"Pass the Bearer at Cornish Bridge" Someone else can tell me where the Cornish bridge is or was.

Toll tokens. There were several bridges between VT/NH one paid tolls, not just Cornish covered bridge.

I agree token for cornish Windsor covered bridge.

toll token

Token of some kind

Token? Pass the bear at Cornish bridge?

Antique bit coins?

A ferry pass.

Windsor VT toll bridge token?

wooden nickels

.

.

Tokens for crossing the bridge.

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As the 28th Annual Newport Symposium approaches, www.newportmansions.org/learn/newport-symposium we look forward to hearing preeminent experts like Eve Kahn, whose lecture, “Forever Seeing New Beauties: Mary Rogers Williams,” will address the life and work of one of America's most accomplished yet least-known Gilded Age female artists. A noted historian and journalist best known for her weekly Antiques column that ran in The New York Times from 2008 to 2016, Kahn is also a writer, scholar and exhibition adviser who specializes in art, architecture, design and preservation. She is a magna cum laude graduate of Harvard University and lectures regularly in New York, New England and elsewhere. Adding to her accolades, Kahn is also an accomplished author. Her most recent book, published in October of 2019, is about the life of Mary Rogers Williams.

To learn more about all of our speakers, visit
www.newportmansions.org/learn/newport-symposium/symposium-speakers
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As the 28th Annual Newport Symposium approaches, https://www.newportmansions.org/learn/newport-symposium we look forward to hearing preeminent experts like Eve Kahn, whose lecture, “Forever Seeing New Beauties: Mary Rogers Williams,” will address the life and work of one of Americas most accomplished yet least-known Gilded Age female artists. A noted historian and journalist best known for her weekly Antiques column that ran in The New York Times from 2008 to 2016, Kahn is also a writer, scholar and exhibition adviser who specializes in art, architecture, design and preservation. She is a magna cum laude graduate of Harvard University and lectures regularly in New York, New England and elsewhere. Adding to her accolades, Kahn is also an accomplished author. Her most recent book, published in October of 2019, is about the life of Mary Rogers Williams.  To learn more about all of our speakers, visit 
https://www.newportmansions.org/learn/newport-symposium/symposium-speakers

We can't wait for this event, and we'll give you three guesses as to who will be providing the Presidential Primary questions!

Join us Jan. 31 at the Rex Theater! Doors open at 6 p.m., and the contest begins at 7! And did we mention there will be live music with the Alli Beaudry Band?

Here's the link to register your team: palacetheatre.secure.force.com/ticket/PatronTicket__PublicTicketApp#/instances/a0F1I00000Almr1UAB
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We cant wait for this event, and well give you three guesses as to who will be providing the Presidential Primary questions!  Join us Jan. 31 at the Rex Theater! Doors open at 6 p.m., and the contest begins at 7! And did we mention there will be live music with the Alli Beaudry Band?  Heres the link to register your team: https://palacetheatre.secure.force.com/ticket/PatronTicket__PublicTicketApp#/instances/a0F1I00000Almr1UAB

A VHS publication, "Repeopling Vermont" is available in our book store (or online vermonthistory.org/shop)Seven Days recently published a review of the new book by historian Paul M. Searls, "Repeopling Vermont: The Paradox of Development in the Twentieth Century".

We spoke with Paul in a recent Before Your Time podcast episode with the Vermont Historical Society about the effort to recruit Swedes to Vermont in the 1880s. Listen to "After the Crossing:" www.beforeyourtime.org/after-the-crossing/

Here's the full book review: www.sevendaysvt.com/vermont/book-review-repeopling-vermont-the-paradox-of-development-in-the-twen...
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A VHS publication, Repeopling Vermont is available in our book store (or online vermonthistory.org/shop)

The Dangremond Museum Studies Internship at the Connecticut Historical Society is a 10-week summer internship that gives college students an opportunity to see first-hand what it’s like to work in a museum.

Since completing his internship in 2016, Steven Foertsch went on to receive a Bachelor’s degree in History and Sociology (with minors in Psychology and Medieval and Early Modern Studies) from Assumption College. Following his undergraduate degrees, Steven served with AmeriCorps and Hartford Area Habitat for Humanity before deciding to continue with his education, pursuing a Masters in Sociology at New School for Social Research in New York City. He is grateful for his experience at CHS and the valuable skills learned through his internship.

Are you or someone you know interested in this immersive program? Eligible students can learn more at bit.ly/2MYBs9U. The deadline for the 2020 internship is March 6th.
#WhereAreTheyNow
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The Dangremond Museum Studies Internship at the Connecticut Historical Society is a 10-week summer internship that gives college students an opportunity to see first-hand what it’s like to work in a museum.  Since completing his internship in 2016, Steven Foertsch went on to receive a Bachelor’s degree in History and Sociology (with minors in Psychology and Medieval and Early Modern Studies) from Assumption College. Following his undergraduate degrees, Steven served with AmeriCorps and Hartford Area Habitat for Humanity before deciding to continue with his education, pursuing a Masters in Sociology at New School for Social Research in New York City. He is grateful for his experience at CHS and the valuable skills learned through his internship.  Are you or someone you know interested in this immersive program? Eligible students can learn more at http://bit.ly/2MYBs9U. The deadline for the 2020 internship is March 6th.
#WhereAreTheyNow

Program 4 of our 1619 series is now available online. Watch "Citizenship & Belonging" with Manisha Sinha, University of Connecticut; Elizabeth Herbin-Triant, University of Massachusetts—Lowell; Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Ohio State University; and moderator Marita Rivero, Museum of African American History, Boston. ... See MoreSee Less

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"200 FOR MAINE'S 200th:" We're launching a series of 200 informative posts on our social media platforms during the Bicentennial year. Content will tap into the collaborative Maine Memory Network, MHS collections & additional sources. The series will intersect with compelling topics as we move from *Holding Up the Sky* to the upcoming *State of Mind: Becoming Maine* (opening March 13) and will promote stories relevant to Maine. Stay engaged by commenting, liking, following & sharing our Facebook community (Instagram & Twitter, too!) ... See MoreSee Less

200 FOR MAINES 200th: Were launching a series of 200 informative posts on our social media platforms during the Bicentennial year. Content will tap into the collaborative Maine Memory Network, MHS collections & additional sources. The series will intersect with compelling topics as we move from *Holding Up the Sky* to the upcoming *State of Mind: Becoming Maine* (opening March 13) and will promote stories relevant to Maine. Stay engaged by commenting, liking, following & sharing our Facebook community (Instagram & Twitter, too!)

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Looking forward to it!

😍. Love Love Love Maine!!! ❤️

A vital part of "Becoming Maine" is Maine's Black History. The skills, labor and innate wisdom of many hundreds of enslaved Africans plus some enslaved indigenous people was foundational to some of Maine's earliest growth and development. Later, their freed, surviving descendants - though often thwarted by racism - enhanced Maine's progress through farming, lumbering and a variety of business enterprises. For more info, see MAINE'S VISIBLE BLACK HISTORY (H.H. Price & Gerald E. Talbot, Tilbury House Press, Gardner, ME 2006) and LIVES OF CONSEQUENCE: Blacks in Early Kittery & Berwick....(Patricia Q. Wall, Portsmouth Historical Society, Portsmouth, NH 2017)

It’s cold, so we’re going to stay inside and color these rad snowmobiles from the ca. 1970s “Color Vermont” souvenir coloring book. ... See MoreSee Less

It’s cold, so we’re going to stay inside and color these rad snowmobiles from the ca. 1970s “Color Vermont” souvenir coloring book.

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They're all dressed for indoor fashion rather than winter outdoors!

No hats on the ladies!

No jackets!

No mittens

No helmets!

Peter

Andy

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Today is Squirrel Appreciation Day. Do you know that there are over 200 species of squirrels in the world? Thankfully they don’t all live in New Hampshire. But photographer Ralph C. Larrabee was fascinated by squirrels and photographed them. Here is a little squirrel enjoying a snack outside the Carter Notch Hut in 1912. ... See MoreSee Less

Today is Squirrel Appreciation Day. Do you know that there are over 200 species of squirrels in the world? Thankfully they don’t all live in New Hampshire. But photographer Ralph C. Larrabee was fascinated by squirrels and photographed them. Here is a little squirrel enjoying a snack outside the Carter Notch Hut in 1912.

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What dog does not appreciate a good squirrel chase

My dog really appreciates squirrels. I mean REALLY.

Thanks Tom

Millyard Museum shared a photo.
Millyard Museum

Everything remains the same!We're Number One! Again! Check out "Travel Host" magazine's Top 10 Things to do in Manchester: cdn.travelhost.com/newhampshire/current-issue/#/22/ ... See MoreSee Less

Everything remains the same!

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On our last visit to my hometown, we spent an hour or so at this museum and recommend it highly!

Awesome

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke with stirring eloquence on a multitude of topics. But through it all runs an underlying theme of justice and our social and individual responsibility to help make it reality.

Here is a quote from King to ponder on the day we honor his life:

"Not everybody can be famous but everybody can be great because greatness is determined by service. You only need a heart full of grace and a soul generated by love.”
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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke with stirring eloquence on a multitude of topics. But through it all runs an underlying theme of justice and our social and individual responsibility to help make it reality.  Here is a quote from King to ponder on the day we honor his life:  Not everybody can be famous but everybody can be great because greatness is determined by service. You only need a heart full of grace and a soul generated by love.”

WATCH: In late 2018, the National Park Foundation purchased the birthplace home of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in Atlanta, Georgia, thanks to donations from a foundation fund created by philanthropist Robert F. Smith. The fund has donated over $40 million dollars to preserve African American culture and history through the National Park Service -- including purchasing the homes of Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman and Booker T. Washington. Over 700,000 people visit the birth home of Rev. King every year. More on the NPF www.nationalparks.org/explore-parks/martin-luther-king-jr-national-historical-park

Martin Luther King Jr.'s homes to be preserved by National Park Service
In our series, A More Perfect Union, we aim to show that what unites us as Americans is far greater than what divides us. In this installment, we focus on the homes where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once dreamed of a brighter future and the man who helped further his vision. Michelle Miller reports.
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Did you know that Martin Luther King, Jr. spent two summers working in Connecticut?

As a young man in 1944, Dr. King first traveled to Simsbury with a group of Morehouse College students to work for in the tobacco fields of the Cullman Brothers.

Tobacco barns like the one shown here would have been a familiar sight to 15-year-old King. He returned in 1947 to once again work in the fields, picking tobacco leaves to be dried in the barns.
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Did you know that Martin Luther King, Jr. spent two summers working in Connecticut?  As a young man in 1944, Dr. King first traveled to Simsbury with a group of Morehouse College students to work for in the tobacco fields of the Cullman Brothers.  Tobacco barns like the one shown here would have been a familiar sight to 15-year-old King. He returned in 1947 to once again work in the fields, picking tobacco leaves to be dried in the barns.

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Yes I did know that, so Very awesome! I grew up in Simsbury and even worked at Culbro Tobacco 😊 Thanks for sharing.

His speeches on our local radio station this morning were inspirational. On 1967 he knew that failure to make peace among the peoples of the earth would insure our mutual destruction. Greatest man of our times in my eyes. How we miss and need him.

As I am a avid reader I am very aware of Dr. Martin Luther King's stay here in Connecticut !! Thanks for sharing !!

A series of these barn in Simsbury sit idly by the road waiting to be rescued...any hope? Might they be ones Dr. King worked at?

Our Second Annual Emerging Scholars Colloquium, scheduled for Saturday, February 8 at Isaac Bell House, is a daylong speaker series featuring original research from young scholars like Sébastien Dutton. A 2019-2020 Preservation Society Research Fellow, Sébastien will examine the remarkable variety of door hardware designs, styles, and uses at The Breakers and how each was employed to distinguish between public, private, family, and service spaces. This program is presented in collaboration with The Decorative Arts Trust.
For more information, contact [email protected] To register, call 401-847-1000, ext. 178 or visit www.newportmansions.org/events/events-calendar/2nd-annual-emerging-scholars-colloquium
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Our Second Annual Emerging Scholars Colloquium, scheduled for Saturday, February 8 at Isaac Bell House, is a daylong speaker series featuring original research from young scholars like Sébastien Dutton. A 2019-2020 Preservation Society Research Fellow, Sébastien will examine the remarkable variety of door hardware designs, styles, and uses at The Breakers and how each was employed to distinguish between public, private, family, and service spaces. This program is presented in collaboration with The Decorative Arts Trust.
For more information, contact emarchi@newportmansions.org. To register, call 401-847-1000, ext. 178 or visit https://www.newportmansions.org/events/events-calendar/2nd-annual-emerging-scholars-colloquium

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What a wonderful opportunity to learn sure wish I could attend.

Please pass the wrench! These young men look hard at work on a chassis during a 1911 auto class at Hillyer Institute. The institute was the educational department of the YMCA of Greater Hartford. ... See MoreSee Less

Please pass the wrench! These young men look hard at work on a chassis during a 1911 auto class at Hillyer Institute. The institute was the educational department of the YMCA of Greater Hartford.

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Wow, 109 years ago!!!

George Washington died in December 1799. It was popular to seek a memento from his life or funeral. On Jan 19, 1800 -- or 220 years ago today -- young Eliza Wadsworth wrote her father Peleg, asking for a keepsake. A friend of the former President, Peleg obtained a lock of Washington's hair for Eliza from Martha Washington. Many years later, Eliza’s nephew Henry Wadsworth Longfellow encased the hair in a gold locket with an inscription about its provenance. It is part of the MHS Collections / MMN # 7280. ... See MoreSee Less

George Washington died in December 1799. It was popular to seek a memento from his life or funeral. On Jan 19, 1800 -- or 220 years ago today -- young Eliza Wadsworth wrote her father Peleg, asking for a keepsake. A friend of the former President, Peleg obtained a lock of Washingtons hair for Eliza from Martha Washington. Many years later, Eliza’s nephew Henry Wadsworth Longfellow encased the hair in a gold locket with an inscription about its provenance. It is part of the MHS Collections / MMN # 7280.

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I do remember there is a lock of Washington’s hair.

It would be cool to do DNA testing on that.

Nice turnout for Paul Timmerman’s talk on the life and times of Major General John Stark! ... See MoreSee Less

Nice turnout for Paul Timmerman’s talk on the life and times of Major General John Stark!

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It was very informative. I’m glad I went

Darn...I missed it.

The Dangremond Museum Studies Internship at the Connecticut Historical Society is a 10-week summer internship that gives college students an opportunity to see firsthand what it’s like to work in a museum.

Since completing her internship in 2019, Lyric Lott continued her History and Museum Studies at Smith College. She is currently in her junior year, and plans to study abroad in London in spring of this year. She is grateful for her experiences at CHS and is excited for the future endeavors awaiting her.

Are you or someone you know interested in this immersive program? Eligible students can learn more at bit.ly/2MYBs9U. The deadline for the 2020 internship is March 6th.
#WhereAreTheyNow
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The Dangremond Museum Studies Internship at the Connecticut Historical Society is a 10-week summer internship that gives college students an opportunity to see firsthand what it’s like to work in a museum.  Since completing her internship in 2019, Lyric Lott continued her History and Museum Studies at Smith College. She is currently in her junior year, and plans to study abroad in London in spring of this year. She is grateful for her experiences at CHS and is excited for the future endeavors awaiting her.  Are you or someone you know interested in this immersive program? Eligible students can learn more at http://bit.ly/2MYBs9U. The deadline for the 2020 internship is March 6th.
#WhereAreTheyNow

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Would love to have our granddaughter, who is entering college in the Fall, consider this for 2021. Thank you for sharing it.

American Senator, orator, statesman, lawyer, and diplomat Daniel Webster was born #OnThisDay in Salisbury, NH, in 1782. Webster is known for many accomplishments, including defending Dartmouth College in a landmark 1819 SCOTUS case. This portrait of Webster, by Albert Gallatin Hoit, is currently on view in our "Discovering New Hampshire" exhibition. ... See MoreSee Less

American Senator, orator, statesman, lawyer, and diplomat Daniel Webster was born #OnThisDay in Salisbury, NH, in 1782. Webster is known for many accomplishments, including defending Dartmouth College in a landmark 1819 SCOTUS case. This portrait of Webster, by Albert Gallatin Hoit, is currently on view in our Discovering New Hampshire exhibition.

Raise a glass for #bootleggersday! The gentlemen pictured were likely using the still to produce illegal whiskey or moonshine.

Help us celebrate the 100th anniversary of Prohibition by joining us tonight for the #bootleggersbash. Break out your 1920s best and head to CHS. Taste popular period cocktails and boogie with your dance partner. Tickets are available at the door, or you can skip the line and buy now!

bit.ly/2NqmLwC

Photo Credit: The Library of Congress
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Raise a glass for #BootleggersDay! The gentlemen pictured were likely using the still to produce illegal whiskey or moonshine.  Help us celebrate the 100th anniversary of Prohibition by joining us tonight for the #BootleggersBash. Break out your 1920s best and head to CHS. Taste popular period cocktails and boogie with your dance partner. Tickets are available at the door, or you can skip the line and buy now!  http://bit.ly/2NqmLwC  Photo Credit: The Library of Congress

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Sure wish I could be there tonight. I live in CA but my old Irish aunts used to talk about going to a place in Hartford referred to as “the bucket of blood”. They would check with their brother, a cop on the Vice Squad to see if it was on the list of speakeasy to be raided that night!

Wish the event ran bit longer then 2 hrs

sometimes you just have to break the law

My gr grandmother made potatoe vodka for the Private Russian Clubs back in those days...the old still house is on the old homestead...

UVM Professor Mary Louise Kete on Lucy Terry Prince: Black Mother of the Republic ... See MoreSee Less

THIS MONTH ONLY: PLEASE CALL 207-774-1822 in advance of the day of your MHS gallery visit to confirm hours. Due to the high volume of school visits to Holding Up the Sky, hours are adjusted daily. ... See MoreSee Less

THIS MONTH ONLY: PLEASE CALL 207-774-1822 in advance of the day of your MHS gallery visit to confirm hours. Due to the high volume of school visits to Holding Up the Sky, hours are adjusted daily.

Thanks Peterborough Economic Development for the great video of our Candlelight Open House with the Prescotts! For those of you who couldn't join us, this gives a nice sense of the evening! Peterborough Economic Development ... See MoreSee Less

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Well done Prescott’s!

How FUN 🙂

How do we approach history with neighbors affected by memory loss? With camaraderie, fellowship, & comfort! Thank you CVS for making Merry Melodies music therapy and our monthly Memory Café possible!
🎸🪕🎻
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How do we approach history with neighbors affected by memory loss? With camaraderie, fellowship, & comfort! Thank you CVS for making Merry Melodies music therapy and our monthly Memory Café possible! 
🎸🪕🎻

Attention college students! Are you curious about what it’s like to work in a museum? Would you like to learn what goes on behind the scenes at an institution dedicated to preserving history?

The CHS is now accepting applications for The Dangremond Museum Studies Internship, a 10-week immersive experience available to students who are currently enrolled at a college or university. Eligible applicants will have completed their sophomore, junior, or senior year by the beginning of the internship.

Interns will work closely with the museum’s Collections, Education, and Exhibitions Departments to complete projects and gain valuable experience.

For more details about the internship, including details on applying, please visit bit.ly/2MYBs9U.
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Attention college students! Are you curious about what it’s like to work in a museum? Would you like to learn what goes on behind the scenes at an institution dedicated to preserving history?  The CHS is now accepting applications for The Dangremond Museum Studies Internship, a 10-week immersive experience available to students who are currently enrolled at a college or university. Eligible applicants will have completed their sophomore, junior, or senior year by the beginning of the internship.  Interns will work closely with the museum’s Collections, Education, and Exhibitions Departments to complete projects and gain valuable experience.  For more details about the internship, including details on applying, please visit http://bit.ly/2MYBs9U.

Grab your best hat for all to see on #NationalHatDay. Perhaps you would like to wear this stylish hat from 1860. Made from green and ivory velvet, green feathers, woven leaves, and even a veil netting. You are sure to be the envy of everyone!

www.nhhistory.org/object/198874/hat
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Grab your best hat for all to see on #NationalHatDay. Perhaps you would like to wear this stylish hat from 1860. Made from green and ivory velvet, green feathers, woven leaves, and even a veil netting. You are sure to be the envy of everyone!  https://www.nhhistory.org/object/198874/hat

#whatisitwednesday awaits! Guess away. ... See MoreSee Less

#whatisitwednesday awaits! Guess away.

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You guys got it! It is a postmaster's stamp, missing the center date that would have been changed out. This one comes from the West Montpelier post office and was used by postmaster Jerome Wright in 1865-66.

Vermont Historical Society, I would like to use this photograph or a higher resolution photograph in the February issue of the Vermont Philatelists. Do I have permission to use it? If so, would I be "out of line"asking for a photograph of the bottom of the cancel?

Postage cancellation killer - the bullseye cancelled the stamp, the town's name is in a circle, missing in the center would be the date

Possibly a cheese brander. Or meat inspectors stamp. Used to mark meat or cheese wheels or other commodities like hides.

I agree that it's some kind of stamp, but the little extra circle on the left is totally mystifying me.

It looks a bit like a cigarette lighter from a car... One side for cigarettes, one side for cigars?

It's a duplex cancel from the late 1800s used to cancel stamps. I wonder what post office it came from

Library stamp

Laser level from early 1800’s !

I see a handle, but no clue for what.

If you're interested in Vermont Postal History visit vermontps.org, the web site of the Vermont Philatelic Society. We publish a quarterly newsletter (28 pages) about the post offices and postal history of Vermont. You may download a sample issue by visiting the webpage. I'm the president of the VPS and editor of the Vermont Philatelist, which has been published every quarter since 1956.

Some kind of a stamp

For holding a drill bit, or a screwdriver thingy?

drawer knob removal tool

Interesting

Some type of stamp

Bank stamp

Wooden barrel tap?

Hi Dan

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Program 3 of our 1619 series is now available online. Watch "Black Radicalism / Black Power" with John Stauffer, Harvard University; Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College; Adrienne Lentz-Smith, Duke University; and moderator Valerie Roberson, Roxbury Community College. ... See MoreSee Less

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Sarah Bauhan and the Elmwood Station Band- tonight in Bass Hall- is SOLD OUT! ... See MoreSee Less

Sarah Bauhan and the Elmwood Station Band- tonight in Bass Hall- is SOLD OUT!

S.O.S.!
2020's first Valley Talk is this Sunday. You'll hear about all the work that went into preserving the pride of Woonsocket, the Stadium Theater. 🎭🏟🎭
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S.O.S.!
2020s first Valley Talk is this Sunday. Youll hear about all the work that went into preserving the pride of Woonsocket, the Stadium Theater. 🎭🏟🎭

Members of the Peterborough High School Band in 1949. Can you help identify these young musicians? #tbt #ThrowbackThursday ... See MoreSee Less

Members of the Peterborough High School Band in 1949. Can you help identify these young musicians? #TBT #throwbackThursday

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Cool picture! Look at the bobby socks on the two girls in the front and the raindeer sweater on the boy in the top row. Also, the teacher is wearing a suit and tie!

That's my Dad, Robert McLean in last row second from right ❤️

That's cool Sandra!

Cool photo! Unfortunately, I don’t have records that go back that far.

The only person I know is George Cass. He is the first on the left holding a clarinet.

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Did they (finally) pop the question over the holidays? Congrats! Spring wedding reservations are now available at rihs.org/rentals ... See MoreSee Less

Did they (finally) pop the question over the holidays? Congrats! Spring wedding reservations are now available at rihs.org/rentals

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Patricia Cotoia

Here's a sneak peak at what's going on behind the scenes at the Wright Museum this offseason...

Renovations to several areas are underway to enhance both the visitor and volunteer/staff experience! Improvements will include additional second floor gallery space, a larger archival storage area, a revamped research library, a larger education space, and more!

Last week, staff and volunteers worked to temporarily relocate the contents of our archives so construction work could commence. Once our new archival storage room is complete, collections staff and volunteers will move artifacts into their new home and begin a reorganization project.

Stay tuned throughout the winter for more updates!
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Since the 1700s, New Hampshire towns have been kept safe by local police forces. Back in 1920, Concord was patrolled by Charles Rowe, City Marshal James E. Rand, Captain Daniel S. Flanders, and Assistant City Marshal John E. Gay. #NationalLawEnforcementAppreciationDay #ThrowbackThursday
www.nhhistory.org/object/1009417/police-station-office-1902
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Since the 1700s, New Hampshire towns have been kept safe by local police forces. Back in 1920, Concord was patrolled by Charles Rowe, City Marshal James E. Rand, Captain Daniel S. Flanders, and Assistant City Marshal John E. Gay. #NationalLawEnforcementAppreciationDay #throwbackThursday
https://www.nhhistory.org/object/1009417/police-station-office-1902

Sarah Bauhan and the Elmwood Station Band - this Saturday in Bass Hall- here's a taste! www.youtube.com/watch?v=miIuWwG84Zo ... See MoreSee Less

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The Bostonian Society shared a post.
The Bostonian Society

Our CEO Nat Sheidley introduces Revolutionary Spaces and talks about our vision for the future of public history. ... See MoreSee Less